Tag Archives: screenings

Maya Deren Forum – Spiel und Ritual

For all those in or around Wuppertal, Germany

Donnerstag, 9. November 2017, 19:00 Uhr, Eintritt frei

2017 wäre Maya Deren 100 Jahre alt geworden. Die 1917 geborene Avantgarde-Filmemacherin, Tänzerin, Poetin, Autorin, Anthropologin und Ausgangspunkt dessen, was kurz darauf als Choreo-Cinéma benannt wurde, hat Künstler und Denker verschiedenster Hintergründe gleichermaßen beeinflusst; insbesondere im Experimentalfilm und in der Verbindung von Film und Tanz.

Vortrag und Film-Screening
Referenten: Florence Freitag and Dr. Claudia Kappenberg

Wo:

Neuer Kunstverein Wuppertal

Hofaue 51 (Kolkmannhaus)

42103 Wuppertal

www.tanzrauschen.de/maya-deren-100/

Die Veranstaltung ist eine Kooperation von Tanzrauschen e.V. Wuppertal und Neuer Kunstverein Wuppertal e.V.

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British dancefilm in Brussels festival

I spent a couple of days in Brussels, where I attended the 6th International Dancefilm Festival L’Art Difficile de Filmer La Danse, which runs 4-7 October at the Cinematek, Danscentrumjette and Argos. The artistic directors are Stefanie Bodien and Wolfgang Kolb, who run the festival together with Roxane Huilmand.

This festival always has one day where it focuses on a particular country, and this time it showed a selection of historical and contemporary British films. Roxane Huilmand and Wolfgang Kolb visited the UK earlier this year where they viewed films at the Lux and the BFI, and met with Gitta Wigro and others. The final selection and curation of the screenings was done by Wolfgang Kolb and Stefanie Bodien, who invited Simon Whitehead to perform at the opening night and asked me to give an overview of dance film in the UK and to introduce the films.

The list of films is included below. It was a great pleasure seeing this selection of films that began with Mime Dance, a 2min film by Ms Mary Montgomery from 1928,  and proceeded via Len Lye’s work for the British, General Post Office (GPO) from the 1930’s and a film by the Rambert Dance Company from the 1970s to work from artists of the London Filmmaker’s Coop, to the more familiar screendance by Peter Anderson, Miranda Pennell and Lloyd Newson, to visual artist Mark Lecky’s Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore (1999), and finished gloriously with Charles Atlas and Michael Clark’s collaboration Hail the New Puritain (1986). The films were organised into four programmes which we watched one after the other, from 3pm to about 10.30pm. It was a feast and most engaging selection and we left hungry for more!

There were some unusual or even controversial works, in particular Dirty (1971), Steven Dwoskin, in which the camera scrutinises two female bodies not unlike most of his other work. A deliberately rough soundtrack and grainy image interfered with the visual consumption of the images to some extend, but more than any other work this film raises questions as to the cinematic gaze and our visual pleasure. Within the 20 or so films and historical narrative, this work was useful though to challenge our spectating. Another intriguing work was Imprint (1974), by Clive Meyer & John Chesworth and the Rambert Dance Company. The 70’s really did take the viewer on a journey and examined the film frame in spectacular ways. I had not seen this film and I found it spellbinding. A film like Boy (1995) by Peter Anderson and Rosemary Lee, perhaps demonstrates the excellence of the area of British TV screendance, and a few other projects could have been included here. But time was limited and finishing the screening with the exhuberant and fantastic Atlas/ Clark collaboration was a brilliant choice in that it embedded dancefilm in a wider cultural context, in this case post-punk London, and played with numerous registers of human frailty and extravagant performance.

Once again I am reminded how important curation is and how much it can open films to new readings and contexts. This programme would be worth taking on tour, to other festivals and other continents. Any takers?

Claudia Kappenberg (Image above: What People Do, Andrew Bar McKay 1981)

List of screened films: 

Memories of Mirrors Ursula Mayer 4’ 9

Mime Dance by Miss Mary Montgomery 2’ 9

Rainbow Dance Len Lye 4’ 9

Between Two Worlds Guy L. Côté 19’ 9

Imprint Clive Meyer & John Chesworth 45’ 9

 

Mantra Jeanette Iljon 6’ 10

Dirty Steven Dwoskin 14’ 10

What People Do Andrew Barr McKay 22’ 10

Falling Under Nicola Baldwin 15’ 10

Pointillist Dance David Leister 14’ 10

 

Dance House n° 2 Tim Albery 6’ 11

Dance House n° 3 Peter Mumford 6’ 11

Boy Peter Anderson/ Rosemary Lee 5’ 11

Lounge Miranda Pennell 7’ 11

Fiorruci Made Me Hardcore Mark Leckey 15’ 11

The Cost Of Living Lloyd Newson 34’ 11

 

Hail the New Puritan Charles Atlas/ Michael Clark 85’ 12

 

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Cinema as Ritual in Transfigured Time

Maya_Deren_Symposium

This was a somewhat spontaneous one-day symposium in Basel on the 20th May 2017, organised by Prof. Dr. Ute Holl, with and for students of the ‘Seminar Medienwissenschaften’ (Media Research Seminar) at the University of Basel, CH.

Convened in order to celebrate 100 years since the birth of Maya Deren, it aimed to explore the relation between dance and trance and cinema. Guest speakers included: Ling Ji Hon (who started the day of with a Tai Chi session), Christine Noll Brinckmann, Mathilde Rosier, Claudia Kappenberg, Moira Sullivan, Florence Freitag. The setting was suitably magical, hosted by Neues Kino Basel, a community-led romantic old building complete with Berlin-style ‘Hinterhof’, screening room, large kitchen diner and ample hang-out spaces.

Ute Hall invited everyone to fully immerse themselves in discussions, and to be flexible around timings and programming. This – and the delicious food – led to a lovely, relaxed and conversational atmosphere. Presenters had also been invited to mix academic discussions with more creative approaches and to screen personal work if suitable, which allowed for new connections to emerge between then and now and between different practices. My favourite was a presentation / screening by Mathilde Rosier, whose work has both visual rigour and a magical, playful character.

And guess what, Maya Deren’s footage and sound recordings from Haiti will feature in this year’s DOCUMENTA in Kassel, together with photos by Deren biographer Martina Kudlacek, work by the Haitian artist Andre Pierre and paintings by Amrita Sher-Gil. The exhibition is curated by Natasha Ginwala. See you there?!

Deren’s work clearly continues to fascinate and entrance people, and is perhaps more relevant than ever.

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Report from Panorama British Screendance

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I am following up on my last post about this event/ panorama in Bordeaux 11th May 2017: to make this happen, Camille Auburtin worked with three partners, the Cinéma Jean Eustache de Pessac in Bordeaux, who hosted the screening and lecture, the Université Populaire du Cinéma of Bordeaux (UNIPOP), and the independent association Cinéréseaux. It was an interesting forum as it brought together several different audiences of all ages, from young and mature filmmakers who work with dancers and screendance to those who had never heard of screendance/ video dance, but have a general interest in cinema and experimental work.

The films looked great on a massive screen in this 400 seater cinema, and were discussed in the context of experimental cinema’s rich history.

For a blog post on the event see: https://www.facebook.com/milleAub/posts/10155222269177246?match=Y2FtaWxsYXU%3D

 

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Panorama British Screendance

On the 11th May I will be presenting two film programmes in Bordeaux as part of an International Panorama of Screendance organised by L’UNIPOP, Université Populaire Cinéma in association with the Cinéma Jean Eustache Pressac.

Screendance is still relatively unknown in France, both as art practice and as a term (despite the Festival in Bourgogne that is run by Marisa Hayes and Franck Boulègue). French artists tend to speak of Videodance, Vidéodanse, which is not a very useful term and can send out the wrong signals. But apart from that, to an audience who does not know what this practice consist of, what kind of historical, British narrative would you propose and what works would you select for a screening?

I decided to start with the wonderful and groundbreaking structuralist filmmaking and artist’ moving image we have in Britain, to make a link with how movement was explored in these works and how it has developed more recently within screendance. Of course one could build many different programmes with this premise and thereby highlight different approaches and areas of choreographic and editorial interest. Below are the two programmes I will be screening in Bordeaux.

Programme 1 (Historical Perspective): Berlin Horse (1970) Malcolm Le Grice and The Whirlpool (1997) Jayne Parker, followed by Tattoo (2001) Miranda Pennell; Boy (1996) Rosemary Lee and Peter Anderson; Snow (2003) David Hinton and Rosemary Lee; Stand in (2009) Becky Edmunds; El Fuego (2007) Becky Edmunds; Snoplog (2014) Chien-Ming Chang and Katy Pendlebury; Edits (2013) Marisa Zanotti and Lea Anderson.

Programme 2 (Choreocinematic Sensibilities):  You made me Love you (2005) 4 minutes, video, Miranda Pennell; Human Radio (2002) 9 minutes, Super 16mm to video, Miranda Pennell; All This Can Happen (2012) 50 min, video, Siobhan Davies and David Hinton.

I look forward to seeing this body of work and to the ‘conversations’ that will emerge between the films.

Claudia Kappenberg

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CHOREOCINEMA, Jan 2017 at the Barbican

Choreocinema: Counterpoints (15*) + ScreenTalk with Siobhan Davies & Miranda Pennell

Hosted by Claudia Kappenberg

24 January 2017 / 18:30
Cinema 3

Siobhan Davies and Miranda Pennell are both artists trained in dance who apply choreography to film. This evening they will present a selection of films and converse about the exploration of movement and stasis in their work.

The programme includes:

You Made Me Love You (
UK 2005) Dir Miranda Pennell 4 min

Why Colonel Bunny Was Killed (
UK 2010) Dir Miranda Pennell 28 min

The Running Tongue (UK 2015) Dir Siobhan Davies and David Hinton 30 min

Extract from All This Can Happen (UK 2012) Dir Siobhan Davies and David Hinton 50 min

This event is part of:

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All This Can Happen @ The White Cube London 6/10/2016

hat-sceneFilm on Sunday: Artist’s Choice

All This Can Happen: Chosen by Antony Gormley

White Cube Auditorium, Bermondsey
144 – 152 Bermondsey Street
London
SE1 3TQ

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The first Leeds Screendance Festival

Filmmaker Andy Wood teamed uop the the Leeds Film Festival:

Screening of 12 screendance shorts from 10 countries: a compelling new programme of international work

Mon 17 November, Carriageworks, Leeds.

http://www.leedsfilm.com/films/leeds-screendance-competition/

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