Tag Archives: dialogues

Post Symposium Pictures

Post Screendance Symposium (April 10-13th at University Wisconsin-Madison) here are a few pictures. In this day and age not many can or want to travel long distances and the whole event was carefully documented to provide wider access to the presentations and long table discussions. I will post a link went the documentation is available online. A set of personal recollections will also be published in the next volume of the Screendance Journal, that is Vol 13. For reference see: https://screendancesymposium.art.wisc.edu/2022-symposium-information/

Photographs by Gitta Wigro and Claudia Kappenberg.

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Publication; This Is Where We Dance Now: Covid-19 and the New and Next in Dance Onscreen

Cover photo by Elena Benthaus, used with permission. Cover design by Regina Harlig.

We are thrilled to announce the publication of The International Journal of Screendance vol. 12, This Is Where We Dance Now: Covid-19 and the New and Next in Dance Onscreen, at https://doi.org/10.18061/ijsd.v12i0.

As always, the issue is free to download.

This journal special issue arose in part to document and account for how amateur, artistic, and academic communities pivoted to reimagine what it means to practice dance and screendance under what for most of us were unprecedented circumstances, when all dance became screendance. A running theme of this issue is how well our existing understandings of screendance—and indeed of our world as a whole—held up under the pressures of a heavily mediated and mediatized pandemic. The intense and collective (though not universal) turn to screendance and to the internet has revealed and accelerated extant politics, platforms, norms, and genres in dance, while also opening up space to reconsider the values attached to each of these. This journal has always maintained the position that screendance encompasses more than dance film, and this issue reflects a renewed insistence that there is something both useful and urgent about gathering together the various projects of dance onscreen and considering them alongside each other.

We are very excited to have contributors writing from five continents, with articles by L. Archer Porter, Francesca Ferrer-Best, Hetty Blades, Claire Loussouarn, Siobhan Murphy, Callum Anderson, Dara Milovanovic, and Kate Mattingly and Tria Blu Wakpa. Provocations and Viewpoints were contributed by Elisa Frasson, Marisa C. Hayes, Marco Longo, Ariadne Mikou, and Katja Vaghi; Catherine Cabeen; Kathryn Logan; Maïko Le Lay; Sandhiya Kalyanasundaram; Elena Benthaus; Rebecca Salzer; Melissa Blanco Borelly and madison moore; Sumedha Bhattacharyya; Diane Busuttil; and Omari ‘Motion’ Carter. The issue also includes Interviews between Laura Vriend and Nichole Canuso, and Tsiambwom Akuchu and Alexandra Harlig, and a review by Jo Cork.

This issue introduces roundtables as a print format, featuring edited and condensed forms of the three roundtables presented at our March symposium: TikTok and Short-form Screendance, Screendance Festivals and Online Audiences, and The Future of Screendance. Additionally, full-length videos are available on both the journal and conference websites.

The editors Harmony Bench and Alexandra Harlig.

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UK Screendance Salon 6/7 April 2016

6 April | CCA, Glasgow and 7 April | Out of the Blue, Edinburgh

Screendance Salon (6-7.30pm) £5.00

A workshop for professionals interested in creating dance works for screen. Join artists and filmmakers involved in Scotland’s growing screendance community. Share your ideas, work-in-progress or completed films and take part in peer-to-peer discussions led by Independent Dance Co-Director, and renowned curator and programmer, Gitta Wigro. To submit a work, please email info@screendance.scot.

Screendance Cinema (8-9.30pm) £5.00 – free for Salon attendees

A screendance cinema curated by Gitta Wigro featuring internationally significant and single screen works. Currently Co-Director of Independent Dance, London, Gitta has curated many international film festivals, including Video Dance Italy, Movement on Screen and VideoDanza,  as well as working in artist development for over 15 years. The evening will finish with a post event discussion and a chance to meet the curator.

For more info, please tel +44 (0) 1309 691661 or email helen@bodysurfscotland.co.uk.

Further INFO @ Bodysurf Scotland

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Dance Hack #2

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This weekend The University of Brighton hosted a second Dance Hack. As last year’s Dance Hack #1 this was organised in partnership with Li   z Mischler from South East Dance and part of Brighton Digital. In difference to last year’s open approach we invited technologists and choreographers to submit seed ideas before hand and selected a few of those. We also invited students form the BA Performance and Visual Arts to join as observer-participants and formed a mixed group of 22 people. Given we had the large Sallis Benney Theatre at at disposal this was a good size group and gave enough space to play for the five clusters that formed in the course of the two days. We used the Friday afternoon to meet and great and to begin to brainstorm ideas and find common ground while the Saturday was used to work, play, explore and test visual, kinetic and technical possibilities. It was noticeable how highly skilled and knowledgeable everyone was, bringing bespoke interactive programmes and refined choreographic toolkits as well as being curious and generous. There was a lot of show and tell as well as new collaborations, and the Hack allowed for people to meet face to face who otherwise only know each other through the web. Even in the digital domain it seems useful to occasionally be in the same room.

It was interesting for me to catch up with this digital avant-garde and to realise how complex and subtle current interfaces and interactions are. Robin McNicolas from Marshmallow Laser Feast introduced us to faceshift for example, a face-mapping software which allows people control pretty much everything in a digital environment through facial muscles and head movements. Marshmallow Laser Feast’s collaboration with the Alexander Whitely Dance Company also premiered at the Old Market on Friday night and was a fine examples of a dialogue between bodies and light and playful choreographic spatial design. Alexander Whitley also joined the Dance Hack and explored looping and repetition of movement on screen to great effect. As technologies are becoming more responsive the dialogues between live bodies and their mediated and projected counterparts are becoming more interesting and complex; for example, a ‘simple’ gesture performed by Alexander became something else all together when repeated, multiplied and looped on screen – or at least the two elements play with our perception in a way that we read and associate very different things.

It also struck me how ‘real’ an experience of virtual space can be, particularly if our own movements are translated into the virtual space and technologies therefore make us believe that we have actually been ‘there’. Extraordinary that we cannot distinguish between mediated, virtual space and actual space, and that we form memories in similar ways. So yes, the potential of what all this can add to our experiences is huge.

Liz Mischler and I are curious to see what will come from these encounters and what else might sprout in the coming days and weeks. We will meanwhile go away and think where we go from here, and what a Dance Hack #3 might look like.

For a brief summery see live stream

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French blog Digidanse

Nicolas Villodre (Collections, La Cinémathèque de la Danse, Paris) reviews After Deren, the new issue of the International Journal of Screendance, and comments on a recent discussion and presentation on Screendance at the Figures du geste dansé;  Digidanse

 

 

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Public Talk at INHA, Paris

Claudia Kappenberg will introduce the International Journal of Screendance and present a paper on the politics of discourse in hybrid practices. 21 February 2014, 17 -19pm, at cehta, located at INHA, Institut national d’histoire de l’art, Paris. 2 Rue Vivienne 75002 : Paris. This is part of an ongoing series of public talks entitled Figures du geste dansé. See http://figuresdugestedanse.blogspot.fr/2013/11/prochaine-seance-vendredi-20-decembre.html

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Report on 24hr Dance Hack

 

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If one has 24hrs it doesn’t matter if technology fails at some point, as there is plenty of time to fix it. With 24hrs there is  little pressure to ‘perform’, because there enough time for ideas to emerge and things to happen. There is also a chance to get to know the people who have come together, and one can begin a conversation, continue a few hrs later and resumer the next morning over a cup of coffee. There is even enough time to take a nap, and to come back and see where things are at.

It is not surprising that the the digital community has taken a linking to this sort of working; it is communal, fun, enterprising, supportive, and low pressure.

We started at 7pm on Saturday eve and by Sunday morning there were new hacks to explore, responsive systems that could be interacted with and tested through movement, to find the strange edges where it would kick in, or drop out. It was interesting to see that the hacks would initially encourage movement and lots of it, while over time the same hacks could also be explored as to their potential to slow down and to minimise activity. The different possibilities lead to  specific and precise dialogues between technology and body(ies).

This encounter between technologists and movers seems very timely, as otherwise how will we comprehend,  explore and advance was has already become an ubiquitous feature of the everyday, the interactive screens on which we are represented.  Highly recommended.

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new videodance blog

Gitta Wigro has set up a page on Facebook, on which she shares festival submission deadlines, funding opportunities (few as they may be!), workshops and interesting articles etc. It is intended as a useful place for anyone interested in the field.

Gitta invites anyone to post  information, or pass it on to her to post – whether it’s your own festival call-out, an article you’ve published, an event you’re running… anything that has the potential to connect screen-dance makers with each other and with the form.

https://www.facebook.com/videodanceMVB

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Matthew Arnold’s Culture and Anarchy (1869)

In a new series of BBC Radio4 entitled The Value of Culture Melvyn Bragg explores the idea and evolution of culture.

The programmes reflect on Matthew Arnold’s Culture and Anarchy (1869), described as one of the most celebrated works of social criticism ever written. It forms the basis for a new discussion of what we understand as culture, and how we determine its value. It returns to the question wheather the arts ought to be valued for their own sake, for their lack of use or for whatever else they might do in the world.

For a commentary by Claudia Kappenberg read her blog post.

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