Tag Archives: community

Publication; This Is Where We Dance Now: Covid-19 and the New and Next in Dance Onscreen

Cover photo by Elena Benthaus, used with permission. Cover design by Regina Harlig.

We are thrilled to announce the publication of The International Journal of Screendance vol. 12, This Is Where We Dance Now: Covid-19 and the New and Next in Dance Onscreen, at https://doi.org/10.18061/ijsd.v12i0.

As always, the issue is free to download.

This journal special issue arose in part to document and account for how amateur, artistic, and academic communities pivoted to reimagine what it means to practice dance and screendance under what for most of us were unprecedented circumstances, when all dance became screendance. A running theme of this issue is how well our existing understandings of screendance—and indeed of our world as a whole—held up under the pressures of a heavily mediated and mediatized pandemic. The intense and collective (though not universal) turn to screendance and to the internet has revealed and accelerated extant politics, platforms, norms, and genres in dance, while also opening up space to reconsider the values attached to each of these. This journal has always maintained the position that screendance encompasses more than dance film, and this issue reflects a renewed insistence that there is something both useful and urgent about gathering together the various projects of dance onscreen and considering them alongside each other.

We are very excited to have contributors writing from five continents, with articles by L. Archer Porter, Francesca Ferrer-Best, Hetty Blades, Claire Loussouarn, Siobhan Murphy, Callum Anderson, Dara Milovanovic, and Kate Mattingly and Tria Blu Wakpa. Provocations and Viewpoints were contributed by Elisa Frasson, Marisa C. Hayes, Marco Longo, Ariadne Mikou, and Katja Vaghi; Catherine Cabeen; Kathryn Logan; Maïko Le Lay; Sandhiya Kalyanasundaram; Elena Benthaus; Rebecca Salzer; Melissa Blanco Borelly and madison moore; Sumedha Bhattacharyya; Diane Busuttil; and Omari ‘Motion’ Carter. The issue also includes Interviews between Laura Vriend and Nichole Canuso, and Tsiambwom Akuchu and Alexandra Harlig, and a review by Jo Cork.

This issue introduces roundtables as a print format, featuring edited and condensed forms of the three roundtables presented at our March symposium: TikTok and Short-form Screendance, Screendance Festivals and Online Audiences, and The Future of Screendance. Additionally, full-length videos are available on both the journal and conference websites.

The editors Harmony Bench and Alexandra Harlig.

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Grounded, Screening 4 live for 24hrs

From about 6pm this eve UK time, SCREENING 4 will be live for 24hrs on coastalcurrents.org.uk/screening-4/

1+1=3 / NARRATIVES

AN EXPLORATION OF HOW OUR BODIES TRY TO MAKE SENSE AND THE STORIES WE TELL

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including:

SALLY POTTER, PLAY (UK, 1970), 16MM FILM TRANSFERRED TO VIDEO, 10.00

ANDREW KÖTTING, BECAUSE THE REST IS SILENCE (UK, 2020), SUPER 8 COLOUR/B/W, SUPER 8 APPS, 16MM ARCHIVE  AND HD VIDEO, 13.29

HAROLD OFFEH, SMILE (UK, 2001), VIDEO, 02.58

OONA DOHERTY, DAVE TYNAN, HUGH OCONNOR, CONCRETE SONG (2017), 03.00

BECKY EDMUNDS, STAND IN (2009), 05.14

LUCY CASH AND SIMONE KENYON, HOW THE EARTH MUST SEE ITSELF (2019), 13.05

EVAN IFEKOYA, CONTOURED THOUGHTS (UK/ICELAND, 2019), VIDEO, 04.42

DAVID BLANDY, HOW TO FLY (2020), VIDEO, 06.22

This is followed by a live online discussion, Saturday 8 Aug 3pm https://www.facebook.com/CoastalCurrents/

And a final Screening 5 Saturday 8 Aug from 6pm for 24hrs http://coastalcurrents.org.uk/screening-5/

 

 

 

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grounded, Screening 1 live for 24hrs

grounded – Screening 1 is live:

INTERIOR WORLDS / EXTERIOR LIVES

AN EXPLORATION OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF BOUNDARIES AND SPACE, AND HOW BODIES MOVE WITHIN AND ACROSS THEM.

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Showing:

BEN RIVERS, THE COMING RACE (IRELAND, 2006), 16MM FILM TRANSFERRED TO VIDEO B/W, 05.00

HARRIET MIDDLETON BAKER, THE WAR ROOM, AN OPERA! (UK, 2018), VIDEO, 11.11

HOLLY BLAKEY, SOME GREATER CLASS (UK, 2015), VIDEO, 03.14 

JORDAN BASEMAN, GENDERSICK (USA, 2019), VIDEO, 12.00

URSULA MAYER, CINESEXUAL (AUSTRIA, 2014), 16MM FILM TRANSFERRED TO VIDEO (SILENT), 03.44

ADHAM FARAMAWY, SKIN FLICK (UK, 2019), VIDEO, 13.30

PAUL MAHEKE, TROPICALITELE ET LEXOTE (FRANCE, 2014), HD VIDEO (SILENT), 12.45

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grounded, A Season of Screendance, 28 July – 9 August

grounded-programme_image_UPDATE

grounded is a season of online screenings that brings work together work from the fields of artist moving image, documentary and screendance.

Each set of films will be available online for 24 hours; the screening dates are

Screening 1: Tuesday 28 July 6pm – Wednesday 29 July 6pm

Screening 2:  Thursday 30 July 6pm – Friday 31 July 6pm

Screening 3:  Tuesday 4 August 6pm – Wednesday 5 August 6pm

Screening 4:  Thursday 6 August 6pm – Friday 7 August 6pm

Talk: Saturday 8 August, 3 – 5pm – LIVE ON FACEBOOK

Screening 5 : Saturday 8 August 6pm – Sunday 9 August 6pm

Supported by the University of Brighton and focusing on artists predominantly based in the south- east of England and London, grounded proposes a way of thinking about movement as a political act. Set against the backdrop of Covid-19, the season considers the variety of ways artists use movement in video and film to explore the relationship of the body to society, of confinement to imagination, and health to politics. Much like the Danse Macabre, a medieval allegory about the equalising power of death, the programme is a space, albeit virtual, where we can reflect on questions around solitude and communication, community and identity, solidarity and our futures.

grounded echoes the approach of those working in grounded theory who gather materials together to understand the social conventions that affect how people act and relate to each other. The season asks how we may break new ground in developing a social fabric that is welcoming, how we traverse boundaries and dissolve conventions, how we nurture newness and mourn what we have lost, how we remember and how we forget, how we explore what it means to be human.

The programme is composed of five online screenings, each appearing online for 24 hours from 6pm, and is hosted by Coastal Currents, Hastings UK. Curated by Claudia Kappenberg, University of Brighton and Fiontán Moran, Tate Modern.

#groundedscreendance

LIST OF ARTISTS: Jordan Baseman, David Blandy, Holly Blakey, Lucy Cash, Lisa Clifford, Phoebe Collings-James, Hugh O’Connor, Oona Doherty, Dave Tynan, Becky Edmunds, Adham Faramawy, HRH, Evan Ifekoya, Onyeka Igwe, Fenia Kotsopoulou, Andrew Kötting, Paul Maheke, Zoë Marden, Ursula Mayer, Harriet Middleton Baker, Graeme Miller, Hugh O’Connor, Harold Offeh, Florence Peake, Sally Potter, Yvonne Rainer, Ben Rivers, John Smith, Eve Stainton, Dave Tynan, Rosa-Johan Uddoh, Cheryl White, Gray Wielebinski.

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Pioneer Barbara Hammer Dies Aged 79

FRIEZE remembers the filmmaker Barbara Hammer, who passed away aged 79 and who also contributed to our journal issue AFTER DEREN, Vol 3 (2013).

“Barbara Hammer, the American artist celebrated as a pioneer of lesbian experimental filmmaking – with a formidable career spanning several decades – has passed away at the age of 79.

Hammer was born in 1939 in Hollywood, California. She first attended the University of California, Los Angeles, graduating with a degree in psychology in 1961. She later studied film at San Francisco State University during the 1970s – around the time that she first came out as a lesbian, leaving her marriage, and taking off on a motorcycle with a Super-8 camera. (…)”

Hammer was the only female student when she studied film, and seeing the work of Maya Deren was a huge inspiration for her. Visual references to Deren’s work can be found in her work, and she also made a film dedicated to Deren entitled Maya Deren’s Sink.  With regards to this film Barbara Hammer wrote:

“It seems so right that I return to Deren and her homes to access the private spaces known only through her films. I hope to ‘open doors’ for others who may not know her work so well. By re-projecting the architectural details from her films back onto the ceilings, walls, floors, cabinets and windows of her homes I call forth her creative spirit and invite viewers, who like me, might have a similar driving curiosity to visit and walk inside the homes where Deren scripted, shot, edited, and projected her films.”

Barbara Hammer’s bountiful energy, positive approach and courage will be missed very much.

 

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Call for entries for Film Rush

From Gitta Wigro, The Place, London UK:

I am pleased to share with you the call for entries for Frame Rush, the festival run by the students on The Place‘s brand new MA in #ScreendanceThey are a fab bunch of artists, and I can’t wait to see the vibrant and rich event they will create.

Submissions are via FilmFreeway; it’s free to submit and the call closes on 7 January 2019.  

The festival itself will take place over two days on 15-16 March 2019, at The Place in London. 

https://filmfreeway.com/FrameRush

https://www.lcds.ac.uk/frame-rush-place-screendance

Best wishes,

Gitta Wigro

Gitta Wigro, dance | film projects

Website http://gwigro.wordpress.com

Dance film news feeds http://www.facebook.com/videodanceMVB and http://twitter.com/dance_film

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From the new Screendance MA

Here is a blog post with comments from the 1st cohort of students on the new Screendance MA at the Place, London; its all about diversity, hybridity and the intersection of practices…

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LONDON CONTEMPORARY DANCE SCHOOL LAUNCHING NEW MA IN SCREENDANCE

London Contemporary Dance School is launching a new Master of Arts programme focusing on the artistic practice, curation and scholarship of Screendance. As the only MA in the world that currently specialises in Screendance, the programme offers a much needed arena for further exploration by practicing artists already making work for screen who are seeking to develop their practical, professional and creative skills.

The programme will be delivered by a leading practitioners in the art from including Gitta Wigro, Lucy Cash, Claudia Kappenberg and course leader Gabriella Tropia. The MA is subject to validation by the University of Kent. The course will commence in September 2018 with applications opening end of January 2018.

London Contemporary Dance School is part of the creative powerhouse for new dance The Place, which is located in the heart of London’s Knowledge Quarter an area of one mile radius that is home to 75 academic, cultural, research, scientific and organisations including British Library, Central Saint Martins, UCL, Crafts Council, Sadler’s Wells and Google.

Clare Connor, Chief Executive of The Place said about the programme; ‘As the leading home for new dance we are pleased to offer this trailblazing MA course that will nurture innovation and entrepreneurship for artists who seek to lead and shape this flourishing art form.’

For more information about the course and how to apply. www.lcds.ac.uk/screendance

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Dance Hack #2

Dance HackIMG_4649DanceHackIMG_4647Dance Hack IMG_4566IMG_4650

This weekend The University of Brighton hosted a second Dance Hack. As last year’s Dance Hack #1 this was organised in partnership with Li   z Mischler from South East Dance and part of Brighton Digital. In difference to last year’s open approach we invited technologists and choreographers to submit seed ideas before hand and selected a few of those. We also invited students form the BA Performance and Visual Arts to join as observer-participants and formed a mixed group of 22 people. Given we had the large Sallis Benney Theatre at at disposal this was a good size group and gave enough space to play for the five clusters that formed in the course of the two days. We used the Friday afternoon to meet and great and to begin to brainstorm ideas and find common ground while the Saturday was used to work, play, explore and test visual, kinetic and technical possibilities. It was noticeable how highly skilled and knowledgeable everyone was, bringing bespoke interactive programmes and refined choreographic toolkits as well as being curious and generous. There was a lot of show and tell as well as new collaborations, and the Hack allowed for people to meet face to face who otherwise only know each other through the web. Even in the digital domain it seems useful to occasionally be in the same room.

It was interesting for me to catch up with this digital avant-garde and to realise how complex and subtle current interfaces and interactions are. Robin McNicolas from Marshmallow Laser Feast introduced us to faceshift for example, a face-mapping software which allows people control pretty much everything in a digital environment through facial muscles and head movements. Marshmallow Laser Feast’s collaboration with the Alexander Whitely Dance Company also premiered at the Old Market on Friday night and was a fine examples of a dialogue between bodies and light and playful choreographic spatial design. Alexander Whitley also joined the Dance Hack and explored looping and repetition of movement on screen to great effect. As technologies are becoming more responsive the dialogues between live bodies and their mediated and projected counterparts are becoming more interesting and complex; for example, a ‘simple’ gesture performed by Alexander became something else all together when repeated, multiplied and looped on screen – or at least the two elements play with our perception in a way that we read and associate very different things.

It also struck me how ‘real’ an experience of virtual space can be, particularly if our own movements are translated into the virtual space and technologies therefore make us believe that we have actually been ‘there’. Extraordinary that we cannot distinguish between mediated, virtual space and actual space, and that we form memories in similar ways. So yes, the potential of what all this can add to our experiences is huge.

Liz Mischler and I are curious to see what will come from these encounters and what else might sprout in the coming days and weeks. We will meanwhile go away and think where we go from here, and what a Dance Hack #3 might look like.

For a brief summery see live stream

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community, screendance and writing: seeking submissions

I wanted to explore things that related to my life; less about the studio, more about what’s outside the studio.

– Charles Atlas (2011, https://www.frieze.com/issue/article/life-stages)

This is a call for papers for volume 5 of the International Journal of Screendance. The theme for this volume will be community and screendance, and we are interested in papers that test the ways in which a broad range of ideas about community influence screendance practices, philosophy, debates and work, and, indeed, how screendance practices and critical thinking might help us to question or subvert the nature and value of community.

Topics could include (but are not limited to):

• Interior positions

What happens to screendance practices when makers work from the inside of communities such as companies, collectives, and other organisations? Rather than standing outside existing works, dance companies, and artistic processes and outcomes, what are the ramifications of adopting an interior position? For example, how might thinking and methods from documentary practices and art film practices such as those used by Charles Atlas and Chantal Akerman suggest new strategies and approaches towards screendance?

• Community dance

Community Dance was once a label that signified choreographic processes and products which valued the social more than the artistic. What screendance practices have helped to question or redefine community arts practices? For example, practitioners like Andy Wood (UK) and Doug Rosenberg (USA) create work with and for their communities (and often with their friends). How is screendance being made through ideas of community? What are the community practices of screendance and why might they be important? Might these relatively small-scale community-oriented screendance practices be considered radical as our understanding of the idea of the social is stretched by the global reach of social media?

• Beyond and because of the computer

Ubiquitous personal computers – particularly laptops – with free video editing software lie at the heart of post-production techniques in film-making and screendance. These techniques happen, for the most part, alone. What might this solitude reveal about community in screendance? If working in your bedroom through a single screen is also about accessing the work of other people in your screendance community, then how does this change and feed our practices? From online tutorials, to the sharing of practices, tests and films, as we work alone we are part of various social interfaces that inform, nurture, and change our thinking and practice.

• Crowd funding

Has the rise of crowd-funding generated new or alternative economies that might support radical practices, emerging practice and minority practices? What alternatives exist, and how might work with – or experiences of – crowd funding generate or facilitate critical thinking about how our practices are part of social economies of practice, support and presentation?

• Support and collaboration

What mechanisms and approaches through various types of communities allow us to practice and thrive as individual artists with distinct visions, and how do such communities allow us to support each other? What collaborative screendance practices are emerging as artists respond to complex and demanding socio-economic environments?

• Screenings and festivals

Screendance festivals are the most common platform for screendance artists to develop and participate in communities around the world. They are where we show and discuss work, meet other practitioners, and have our work placed alongside other works in programs that are curated to a greater or less extent. But what of other methods for showing work? For example, how might single screenings build, disrupt or broaden our understanding of community?  Further to this, what role do screenings of canonical screendance works – Maya Deren, Stan Brakhage – have to play in developing community-based dialogues about our discipline?

We invite contributions of scholarly research, interviews, reviews, provocations, viewpoints, visual essays, and work by emerging scholars on the theme of community. For the purposes of review, please indicate which of the above categories best characterize your contribution. Please note: scholarly papers are peer-reviewed in a double-blind process, and should be 3500-6000 words. All other contributions will be reviewed by the editorial board. The deadline for all contributions is 1 August 2014. The volume will be published online in March 2015 following the peer-review and editorial process.

Previous issues of the IJSD are available at http://journals.library.wisc.edu/index.php/screendance.

Volume 5 of IJSD will be published online using the Open Journal System at screendancejournal.org.

Very best wishes

Harmony Bench and Simon Ellis (editors, Int J. of Screendance)

bench.9@osu.edu

simon.ellis@roehampton.ac.uk

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