Panorama British Screendance

On the 11th May I will be presenting two film programmes in Bordeaux as part of an International Panorama of Screendance organised by L’UNIPOP, Université Populaire Cinéma in association with the Cinéma Jean Eustache Pressac.

Screendance is still relatively unknown in France, both as art practice and as a term (despite the Festival in Bourgogne that is run by Marisa Hayes and Franck Boulègue). French artists tend to speak of Videodance, Vidéodanse, which is not a very useful term and can send out the wrong signals. But apart from that, to an audience who does not know what this practice consist of, what kind of historical, British narrative would you propose and what works would you select for a screening?

I decided to start with the wonderful and groundbreaking structuralist filmmaking and artist’ moving image we have in Britain, to make a link with how movement was explored in these works and how it has developed more recently within screendance. Of course one could build many different programmes with this premise and thereby highlight different approaches and areas of choreographic and editorial interest. Below are the two programmes I will be screening in Bordeaux.

Programme 1 (Historical Perspective): Berlin Horse (1970) Malcolm Le Grice and The Whirlpool (1997) Jayne Parker, followed by Tattoo (2001) Miranda Pennell; Boy (1996) Rosemary Lee and Peter Anderson; Snow (2003) David Hinton and Rosemary Lee; Stand in (2009) Becky Edmunds; El Fuego (2007) Becky Edmunds; Snoplog (2014) Chien-Ming Chang and Katy Pendlebury; Edits (2013) Marisa Zanotti and Lea Anderson.

Programme 2 (Choreocinematic Sensibilities):  You made me Love you (2005) 4 minutes, video, Miranda Pennell; Human Radio (2002) 9 minutes, Super 16mm to video, Miranda Pennell; All This Can Happen (2012) 50 min, video, Siobhan Davies and David Hinton.

I look forward to seeing this body of work and to the ‘conversations’ that will emerge between the films.

Claudia Kappenberg

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Visual Cultures: Decoding the Music Video

This event explores how filmmakers of colour are responding to new technologies, creating fresh work that is opening up new spaces for conversation around the exclusivity of filmmaking.

https://www.ica.art/whats-on/visual-cultures-decoding-music-video

Friday 30 March 2017
Institute of Contemporary Arts, London
6:30pm

Call for Papers – Vidéo Danse de Bourgogne (France)

International Screendance Conference 2017 : Low-tech/Old-tech

Cameras do not make films; filmmakers make films. – Maya Deren

The fifth annual Screendance Conference held during the Festival International de Vidéo Danse de Bourgogne (France) is currently seeking papers that address the theme: low-tech/old-tech.  The conference will take place on June 1-2, 2017 at the University of Burgundy in Le Creusot, France.

As a festival that has consistently favored ideas and artistic ingenuity over imposing the use of so-called “high production values”, this year’s conference theme proposes an investigation into the aesthetics, politics, and practices surrounding the rejection of: environmental waste created by technological consumerism, equipment monopolies that limit creative freedoms, as well as the normalization of HD and other production values that potentially limit creation, curation, and distribution opportunities in screendance. Papers that consider how screendance has and can encourage an exchange of ideas and new forms of expression by eschewing capitalist economies of filmmaking in favor of radical re-imaginings of low-tech and old-tech equipment will be presented in the form of moderated panels, round tables and individual talks. Proposals for individual papers and/or entire panels will be considered.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • How economies of screendance include and exclude filmmakers during production, curation and/or distribution.
  • Re-evaluating the notion of production “values” – What is of value in production? And who decides?
  • Reuse and recycle – radical aesthetics and re-imagining of old and low-budget technologies. From the dirty camera lenses of Guy   Madden intentionally left opaque, to guerilla street filming tactics, how are old and low technologies engaged within the hybrid framework of screendance and to what ends?
  • Screendance pedagogy – using low-tech and/or old-tech devices to teach screendance and engage with communities, professionals, and/or students.
  • Analyses of individual films past and present that resonate with the conference theme are also encouraged.

In addition to film and performance studies, presentations that draw on complementary fields such as curatorial studies, art history, and other areas of creative and intellectual inquiry are welcome.

To propose a paper, please send a 500 word abstract that clearly states your topic, thesis, and supporting ideas. Keep in mind that paper presentations are normally twenty minutes in length. It is better to focus on one or several central ideas than to be overly ambitious in scope, which leaves little time for in depth consideration of the proposed topic. Please include a biography or C.V. with your proposal. Artist presentations (practice-based research) proposals are eligible, but must have a clear research focus that relates to the theme. Alternative presentation formats are welcome, but please describe your proposed format and technical needs clearly. The working language of the conference is English. Deadline for proposals: March 21, 2017. E-mail proposals to: info@videodansebourgogne.com  All proposals receive a confirmation e-mail upon receipt. Further notification will be sent to all proposals before April 1 via e-mail regarding status of acceptance. The call is also available at: https://videodansebourgogne.com/2013-screendance-conferencecolloque-cine-danse-2013/

About the conference: For five years the Festival International de Vidéo Danse de Bourgogne has proposed an annual two-day conference intended as an international meeting place for artists, scholars, students, and anyone interested in the intersections of choreography and the moving image. Occurring during the festival week, evening screenings, informal talks and other meet-ups compliment the conference presentations. Le Creusot is a small city situated on the train line between Paris and Lyon (one hour from Paris on the speed train, 20 minutes from Lyon). There is no fee to participate in the conference. Conference presentations may be invited for publication on the Screendance Studies blog or future publications, such as our 2015 book, Art in Motion: Current Research in Screendance:

http://www.cambridgescholars.com/art-in-motion

CHOREOCINEMA, Jan 2017 at the Barbican

Choreocinema: Counterpoints (15*) + ScreenTalk with Siobhan Davies & Miranda Pennell

Hosted by Claudia Kappenberg

24 January 2017 / 18:30
Cinema 3

Siobhan Davies and Miranda Pennell are both artists trained in dance who apply choreography to film. This evening they will present a selection of films and converse about the exploration of movement and stasis in their work.

The programme includes:

You Made Me Love You (
UK 2005) Dir Miranda Pennell 4 min

Why Colonel Bunny Was Killed (
UK 2010) Dir Miranda Pennell 28 min

The Running Tongue (UK 2015) Dir Siobhan Davies and David Hinton 30 min

Extract from All This Can Happen (UK 2012) Dir Siobhan Davies and David Hinton 50 min

This event is part of:

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The International Journal of Screendance Volume 7: All This: Writings on “All This Can Happen” now online

ijsdv7cover

New International Journal of Screendance issue online: Special issue on “All This Can Happen” by Siobhan Davies and David Hinton, edited by Claudia Kappenberg with Sarah Whatley.

 

All This Can Happen @ The White Cube London 6/10/2016

hat-sceneFilm on Sunday: Artist’s Choice

All This Can Happen: Chosen by Antony Gormley

White Cube Auditorium, Bermondsey
144 – 152 Bermondsey Street
London
SE1 3TQ

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OPEN CALL: Maya Deren 100 Wuppertal, Germany, June 16-18 2017

allsoulsinvited“Unstable Equilibrium / Instabiles Gleichgewicht” Maya Deren 100

Symposium/Screenings/Interventions  June 16-18 2017

Location: Neuer Kunstverein Wuppertal e.V., Wuppertal, Germany

Call for papers: submission deadline: 5 December 2016

For enquiries please email the curators of the symposium Claudia Kappenberg (C.Kappenberg@brighton.ac.uk) and Florence Freitag (florence.freitag@gmail.com)

2017 marks the year of Maya Deren’s 100th anniversary. Born in 1917, the Avant-Garde filmmaker, dancer, poet, writer, anthropologist and catalyst for what is called Choreo-Cinéma, has influenced artists and thinkers from different fields, in particular those interested in experimental film and in the intersection of film and dance. In 2017 her work is still relevant in terms of the images it offers, the stories it tells and the questions it asks about individual experience, communal traditions and our narratives. The interdisciplinarity of her work marks her as a pioneer of hybrid visual languages and has much to offer to contemporary artists whose work increasingly negotiates between different practices, languages and traditions. Whilst being highly refined and specific Deren’s work claims a “touche-à-tout”. This event will reflect on Deren’s work from several perspectives, to re-examine not only her films, but also her writing and her anthropological research into Haitian rituals and voudoun. Maya Deren 100 will run over three days and in three parts, with a symposium, a series of screenings, and interventions by contemporary artists.

Maya Deren – REpositioned aims to historically review and contextualise her work, her principles, aesthetics and methods from diverse contemporary perspectives. Engaging with Deren’s artistic, theoretical and pedagogical discourse, the symposium aims to foster discussions on choreographic, visual and performative languages, on the role and potentiality of narratives, on collaborations and on the idea of metamorphosis or change as suggested by Deren’s notion of Unstable Equilibrium. Furthermore, proposals are invited that examine Deren’s writings on ritual, her concern with time, space and matter, as well as those engaging with dialogues between (digital) screen bodies and live bodies, screen space and narrative time. Finally, Deren’s output as both female artist/auteur and as the main performer in her work is to be re-examined from today’s point of view.

Papers and project presentations may include, but are not limited to, the following areas:

→ Film & digital bodies vs live bodies

→ Choreo-Cinéma as/vs live performance

→ Film & poetry (e.g. vertical and other narratives)

→ Film & ritual, ritual and play

→ Anthropology as practice

→ Relation to time, space and place

→ Film and dance and relevant hybrid language

→ Documentation as practice (including the subject/object in front and behind the camera)

→ Instability, hybridity and continuity in the arts

Proposals should be no more than 300 words and must include:

  • Presentation title
  • 300 word abstract, to include a brief description of the questions, concepts and topics to be explored
  • Preferred presentation format/approach
  • AV requirements
  • Short biography

Maya Deren 100/Unstable Equilibrium is a project produced by Tanzrauschen e.V. (Sigurd-Christian Evers and Kerstin Hamburg) and Neuer Kunstverein Wuppertal e.V., organized in collaboration with initiator/artistic director Florence Freitag, as well as curators Claudia Kappenberg (University of Brighton, UK, International Journal of Screendance) and Dr. Elinor Cleghorn.

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International Journal of Screendance Volume 8: call for papers

This is an open call for submissions to Volume 8 of the International Journal of Screendance: http://screendancejournal.org/.

The focus of IJSD is to support and nurture cross-disciplinary writing on screendance. This call is an opportunity for artists and scholars to develop and debate ideas at the intersection of film, dance, visual arts, and media arts. Contributions to IJSD will expand and critique contemporary notions of screen-based images and changing choreographic practices, and engage with theories and philosophies from interdisciplinary fields.

We invite contributions related to all aspects of screendance production, curation, reception, history, and analysis in the forms of scholarly research (articles), interviews, reviews, provocations and viewpoints, visual essays, as well as work by emerging scholars. We particularly welcome contributions from outside the United States and United Kingdom.

Schedule:

  • Submission Deadline: 5 August 2016
  • Publication Date: April 2017

For enquiries please email the International Journal of Screendance editors Harmony Bench bench.9@osu.edu and Simon Ellis simonkellis@gmail.com

Further information

  • Scholarly articles (3500–6000 words) are peer-reviewed in a fully anonymous process. All other contributions will be reviewed by the editorial board. We are also interested in publishing Interviews (2000–3000 words), Reviews of books, films, or events (750–1000 words) and Provocations and Viewpoints (750–1000 words). For the purposes of review, please indicate which of the above categories best characterizes your contribution.
  • If you are interested in submitting a contribution that does not fall into the above categories, please contact the editors for additional direction.
  • Authors must register with IJSD at http://screendancejournal.org in order to upload submissions. All submissions should be uploaded by authors in .docx or .rtf format.
  • Please use the IJSD style guide – http://screendancejournal.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines – to correctly format your document.
  • Example article (to help with formatting and style guide questions): http://dx.doi.org/10.18061/ijsd.v5i0.4423
  • Publications in all sections are indexed, but only scholarly articles are peer-reviewed. Please see IJSD’s Editorial Policies for more information.
  • The International Journal of Screendance is published via the Open Journal System.
  • IJSD is published in English and uses American spelling and punctuation.
  • IJSD is published as PDF and HTML files and is fully open access. We serve the screendance field as a whole; therefore, there are no fees for submission, processing, publication, or access to IJSD.
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ijsd volume 6 online

Harmony Bench and Simon Ellis are pleased to announce that Volume 6 of the International Journal of Screendance is now online:

http://screendancejournal.org/issue/view/167

The journal is fully open access.

Thanks to all the contributors, reviewers, copy-editors, OJS support at Ohio State (Melanie Schlosser and Ingrid Schneider), and to both the Centre for Dance Research (C-DaRE, Coventry University) and The Ohio State University for their support.

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Light Moves festival of screendance 2016 Open Call for Film Submissions

Light Moves festival of screendance has announced its Open Call for Film Submissions for this year’s festival, which takes place in Limerick from 3-6 November 2016.  Filmmakers, choreographers and video artists are invited to submit for consideration screendance works which embrace dance and all forms of movement through the art of film and video art.  Submissions should be made via the festival website www.lightmoves.ie  The closing date for receipt of entries is Friday 27 May 2016.  Prizes will be awarded to both established and student practitioners for works submitted via the Open Call.  Full details, terms and conditions are available from www.lightmoves.ie.

Works which will be considered include:
– Long films exceeding 20 minutes duration to be presented in a cinematic context.
– Short films not exceeding 20 minutes duration to be presented in a cinematic context.
– Short films and video art to be presented on individual displays in a gallery/installation context.
– Documentaries.
– Student films in which the director and/or the choreographer is a registered student on a course up to and including MA level.

In addition to films which embrace dance, submissions that reflect the unique potential of cinematography and sound as well as alternative forms such as animation and computer modelling will also be considered.  While previously screened works are accepted, recent works will be given particular consideration in the selection process.

Announcing the Open Call Jenny Traynor, Director of Dance Limerick which produces Light Moves, said “We’re very excited to announce this year’s Open Call for film submissions for Light Moves.  The standard of work submitted by Irish and international practitioners since the festival began two years ago has been extremely high, so we’re very much looking forward to viewing this year’s entries.  Filmmakers should note our earlier than usual deadline and make sure to have their entries with us by the 27th of May”.

Light Moves is Ireland’s only festival dedicated to the art of dance on film and video art with movement as a central theme, and is a response to the vibrant and expanding field of dance film / screendance in Ireland and internationally.  The festival combines classics, family screenings, invited works, open submissions and explorations of screendance with some of the most respected figures in the field.  Light Moves is curated by Jurgen Simpson and Mary Wycherley and produced by Dance Limerick.  Light Moves is supported by the Arts Council, Limerick City and County Council, Dance Limerick and DMARC, University of Limerick.  See www.lightmoves.ie

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