Category Archives: Uncategorized

Call for entries for Film Rush

From Gitta Wigro, The Place, London UK:

I am pleased to share with you the call for entries for Frame Rush, the festival run by the students on The Place‘s brand new MA in #ScreendanceThey are a fab bunch of artists, and I can’t wait to see the vibrant and rich event they will create.

Submissions are via FilmFreeway; it’s free to submit and the call closes on 7 January 2019.  

The festival itself will take place over two days on 15-16 March 2019, at The Place in London. 

https://filmfreeway.com/FrameRush

https://www.lcds.ac.uk/frame-rush-place-screendance

Best wishes,

Gitta Wigro

Gitta Wigro, dance | film projects

Website http://gwigro.wordpress.com

Dance film news feeds http://www.facebook.com/videodanceMVB and http://twitter.com/dance_film

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International Journal of Screendance Volume 10: “Screendance Now” open call for papers

 

This is an open call for submissions to Volume 10 of the International Journal of Screendance: http://screendancejournal.org.

The past several years have witnessed the growth and consolidation of screendance studies as a scholarly field, while the creative practices at the intersection of dance and screen continue to proliferate, change, and challenge. The first volume of IJSD asserted with the provocation that “Screendance has not yet been invented.” Volume 10 of IJSD presents an opportunity to reflect on screendance now. Where do we find ourselves as a field? How do audiences currently engage with dance onscreen? On what tools and resources do artists rely? What pressing questions and concerns are on our collective horizon, and what are the lingering issues that have not been fully addressed?

We invite contributions related to all aspects of screendance production, curation, reception, history, and analysis in the forms of scholarly research (articles), interviews, reviews, provocations and viewpoints, and visual essays. We invite contributions that address dance film and festivals, dance in global popular cinemas and television, dance in social media, installation and digital dance, dance games, and any other possible combination of dance and screen. We particularly welcome contributions from emerging scholars, and from artists and scholars working outside the United States and United Kingdom.

The focus of IJSD is to support and nurture cross-disciplinary writing on screendance by developing ideas and debates at the intersection of film, dance, visual arts, and media arts. Contributions to IJSD will expand and critique contemporary notions of screen-based images and changing choreographic practices, and engage with theories and philosophies from interdisciplinary fields.

Schedule:

  • Submission Deadline: 1 August 2018
  • Publication Date: April 2019

For enquiries please email the International Journal of Screendance editors Harmony Bench bench.9@osu.edu and Simon Ellis skellis.info@protonmail.com

Further information

  • Scholarly articles (3500–6000 words) are peer-reviewed in a fully anonymous process. All other contributions will be reviewed by the editorial board. We are also interested in publishing Interviews (2000–3000 words), Reviews of books, films, or events (750–1000 words) and Provocations and Viewpoints (750–1000 words). For the purposes of our review process, please indicate which of the above categories best characterizes your contribution.
  • If you are interested in submitting a contribution that does not fall into the above categories, please contact the editors for additional direction.
  • Authors must register with IJSD at http://screendancejournal.org in order to upload submissions. All submissions should be uploaded by authors in .docx or .rtf format.
  • Please use the IJSD style guide – http://screendancejournal.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines – to correctly format your document.
  • Example article (to help with formatting and style guide questions): http://dx.doi.org/10.18061/ijsd.v5i0.4423
  • Publications in all sections are indexed, but only scholarly articles are peer-reviewed. Please see IJSD’s Editorial Policies for more information.
  • The International Journal of Screendance is published via the Open Journal System.
  • IJSD is published in English and uses American spelling and punctuation.
  • IJSD is published as PDF and HTML files under a Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY). You can read more about the license here: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
    or view the full legal text here: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode
    We serve the screendance field as a whole; therefore, there are no fees for submission, processing, publication, or access to IJSD.
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The Work Room launches new online screendance film series

Showcasing Scotland’s dance artists making work for screen
  • 4 new films commissioned by The Space interviewing choreographers and directors about the processes behind making their pieces
  • All of the dance artists are members of Glasgow-based, artist-led dance organisation The Work Room
  • Katrina McPherson, an award-winning director, screen dance artist and author of ‘Making Video Dance’, is producing the artist interviews
  • All films will be available to watch online for free via a new YouTube channel

Glasgow-based dance organisation The Work Room has been commissioned by digital commissioning agency The Space to showcase work from artists experimenting with dance and film, in a new series called ‘In Motion’. The works were created specifically for screen, commenting on subjects as diverse as Brexit, the uncertainty and stress felt when continually being forced to move house, women reclaiming the streets at night, and civil disobedience.

These films highlight how Scotland’s choreographers and dance artists are combining film and dance to make powerful creative expressions about the world we live in.

The first film will be released on Tuesday 3 April and will be streamed live on The Work Room’s Facebook page @theworkroomglasgow as well as available to watch on YouTube.

A new film will be released every Tuesday until 24 April.

Faux Pas, by Stasis
Shot in Glasgow’s Barrowlands, this film reacts against the visual stereotypes of young women often portrayed in mainstream film by showing how the female form can reclaim the streets at night. These women are far from vulnerable as they work closely and collaboratively to make space for themselves and have a riotous time among the industrial backstreets.

Never Walk Alone, by Bridie Gane
A timely piece that explores the UK’s relationship with Europe, Bridie uses extremely slow movement infused with a retro theatricality to produce a wry commentary that will resonate with many.

Movement in Progress, by Lucas Chih-Peng Kao
Taiwanese dancer Kai ended up moving house twelve times in a mere two years whilst living in Glasgow. This part-documentary part-dance performance is a touching story about how it feels to continually be on the move and how we hold onto memories attached to where we live.

Cells of Illegal Education, by Farah Saleh
Between 1988 and 1992, schools and universities in Occupied Palestine were closed by Israeli military rule and those who refused to abide were labelled as ‘cells of illegal education’. In this film, Fareh Saleh reenacts, transforms and deforms gestures that were exercised by students at Birzeit University to take a closer look at the role of civil disobedience in instigating societal change and how their echoes are felt in contemporary times.

Filmmaker and director of In Motion, Katrina McPherson says, For nearly 30 years, based in Scotland and often working internationally, I have made work in collaboration with many different dance artists, and taught the subject all over the world. It makes me particularly happy to see the wealth of activity in this area now happening in Scotland. Dance artists and filmmakers are using whatever technology they have to make movement-based work for screen that explores and communicates ideas, themes and stories they feel passionate about. I am very excited to have the opportunity to share some of this work with you through In Motion, a curated selection of original screen dance works, made in Scotland, and available to watch worldwide online.”

Director of The Work Room, Anita Clark says“We are very excited to be working with The Space to bring screendance from some of Scotland’s independent choreographers to new audiences. The Work Room empowers artists to lead in their practice, and In Motion is enabling us to develop this digitally.”

Fiona Morris, CEO and Creative Director of The Space said, “The Space is delighted to be partnering with The Work Room and supporting the organisation in both building its digital capacity, and ensuring its works are accessible to the widest possible audience.”

https://theworkroom.org.uk/

Watch the films online at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC73044vqz2LDQ2Rbg9AS_2A

Notes for editors

About The Work Room
The Work Room (TWR) is an artist-led organisation, committed to supporting a sustainable environment for independent artists working in dance in Scotland. Our mission is to empower artists to lead in their practice, enabling them to make high quality, pioneering dance for diverse contexts at home and internationally. We are based within Glasgow’s Tramway where we have a studio for choreographic residencies.

The Work Room is supported by Creative Scotland as an RFO and by Glasgow City Council.

About The Space

The Space is a commissioning and development organisation, established by Arts Council England and the BBC to support greater digital access to the arts. The Space is committed to supporting and facilitating the UK arts sector to realise its digital ambitions. The organisation commissions arts projects and provides a production and distribution support to ensure that these projects reach a wide and diverse range of audiences. The Space has supported In Motion through funding from Creative Scotland, Arts Council England, and the BBC.

Biography
Katrina McPherson is award-winning screen dance artist, whose single, multi-screen and online works have been presented at venues and festivals world-wide. She trained as a dancer and choreographer at Laban, London after which an early career fascination with the creative possibilities of dance and the moving image took her to art college to study video art. A number of works directed by Katrina are held in collections including Lux Artists’ Moving Image UK, Routledge Performance Archive and the British Council. She is a director of arts programmes for UK television making films for BBC, Scottish Television and Channel Four, and was co-director of Goat Media Productions from 2001-2015.  Katrina has taught screen dance in the UK, Australia, Germany, USA, Canada and China and she is the author of Making Video Dance (Routledge 2006), the first workbook for screen dance which is used as a core text for courses at universities world-wide, with a new edition due out in the summer 0f 2018.

Visual Cultures: Decoding the Music Video

This event explores how filmmakers of colour are responding to new technologies, creating fresh work that is opening up new spaces for conversation around the exclusivity of filmmaking.

https://www.ica.art/whats-on/visual-cultures-decoding-music-video

Friday 30 March 2017
Institute of Contemporary Arts, London
6:30pm

The International Journal of Screendance Volume 7: All This: Writings on “All This Can Happen” now online

ijsdv7cover

New International Journal of Screendance issue online: Special issue on “All This Can Happen” by Siobhan Davies and David Hinton, edited by Claudia Kappenberg with Sarah Whatley.

 

International Journal of Screendance Volume 8: call for papers

This is an open call for submissions to Volume 8 of the International Journal of Screendance: http://screendancejournal.org/.

The focus of IJSD is to support and nurture cross-disciplinary writing on screendance. This call is an opportunity for artists and scholars to develop and debate ideas at the intersection of film, dance, visual arts, and media arts. Contributions to IJSD will expand and critique contemporary notions of screen-based images and changing choreographic practices, and engage with theories and philosophies from interdisciplinary fields.

We invite contributions related to all aspects of screendance production, curation, reception, history, and analysis in the forms of scholarly research (articles), interviews, reviews, provocations and viewpoints, visual essays, as well as work by emerging scholars. We particularly welcome contributions from outside the United States and United Kingdom.

Schedule:

  • Submission Deadline: 5 August 2016
  • Publication Date: April 2017

For enquiries please email the International Journal of Screendance editors Harmony Bench bench.9@osu.edu and Simon Ellis simonkellis@gmail.com

Further information

  • Scholarly articles (3500–6000 words) are peer-reviewed in a fully anonymous process. All other contributions will be reviewed by the editorial board. We are also interested in publishing Interviews (2000–3000 words), Reviews of books, films, or events (750–1000 words) and Provocations and Viewpoints (750–1000 words). For the purposes of review, please indicate which of the above categories best characterizes your contribution.
  • If you are interested in submitting a contribution that does not fall into the above categories, please contact the editors for additional direction.
  • Authors must register with IJSD at http://screendancejournal.org in order to upload submissions. All submissions should be uploaded by authors in .docx or .rtf format.
  • Please use the IJSD style guide – http://screendancejournal.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines – to correctly format your document.
  • Example article (to help with formatting and style guide questions): http://dx.doi.org/10.18061/ijsd.v5i0.4423
  • Publications in all sections are indexed, but only scholarly articles are peer-reviewed. Please see IJSD’s Editorial Policies for more information.
  • The International Journal of Screendance is published via the Open Journal System.
  • IJSD is published in English and uses American spelling and punctuation.
  • IJSD is published as PDF and HTML files and is fully open access. We serve the screendance field as a whole; therefore, there are no fees for submission, processing, publication, or access to IJSD.
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Light Moves festival of screendance 2016 Open Call for Film Submissions

Light Moves festival of screendance has announced its Open Call for Film Submissions for this year’s festival, which takes place in Limerick from 3-6 November 2016.  Filmmakers, choreographers and video artists are invited to submit for consideration screendance works which embrace dance and all forms of movement through the art of film and video art.  Submissions should be made via the festival website www.lightmoves.ie  The closing date for receipt of entries is Friday 27 May 2016.  Prizes will be awarded to both established and student practitioners for works submitted via the Open Call.  Full details, terms and conditions are available from www.lightmoves.ie.

Works which will be considered include:
– Long films exceeding 20 minutes duration to be presented in a cinematic context.
– Short films not exceeding 20 minutes duration to be presented in a cinematic context.
– Short films and video art to be presented on individual displays in a gallery/installation context.
– Documentaries.
– Student films in which the director and/or the choreographer is a registered student on a course up to and including MA level.

In addition to films which embrace dance, submissions that reflect the unique potential of cinematography and sound as well as alternative forms such as animation and computer modelling will also be considered.  While previously screened works are accepted, recent works will be given particular consideration in the selection process.

Announcing the Open Call Jenny Traynor, Director of Dance Limerick which produces Light Moves, said “We’re very excited to announce this year’s Open Call for film submissions for Light Moves.  The standard of work submitted by Irish and international practitioners since the festival began two years ago has been extremely high, so we’re very much looking forward to viewing this year’s entries.  Filmmakers should note our earlier than usual deadline and make sure to have their entries with us by the 27th of May”.

Light Moves is Ireland’s only festival dedicated to the art of dance on film and video art with movement as a central theme, and is a response to the vibrant and expanding field of dance film / screendance in Ireland and internationally.  The festival combines classics, family screenings, invited works, open submissions and explorations of screendance with some of the most respected figures in the field.  Light Moves is curated by Jurgen Simpson and Mary Wycherley and produced by Dance Limerick.  Light Moves is supported by the Arts Council, Limerick City and County Council, Dance Limerick and DMARC, University of Limerick.  See www.lightmoves.ie

Brief Thoughts on the Art of the Animated GIF

Repetition, Transformation and Isolated Motion in the Screendance Gif – food for screendance scholarship by Marisa Hayes.

SCREENDANCE STUDIES

Fluid_Berkeleyhands

            Most Internet users are aware of the recent rise of the animated GIF, an acronym that stands for “Graphics Interchange Format” (1). These silent moving images are composed of brief motion sequences referred to as “loops”, most often excerpted from classic cinema or popular culture, although original creations and home videos are common as well. Occasionally, still images, including photographs, paintings, and screengrabs are also used as source material for GIFs that undergo a transition to become moving images through layers of added motion via animation techniques. GIFs play on an endless loop, which results in a hypnotic quality that frequently renders it difficult to identify a linear progression of where their movements begin and end. Populating a wide range of online locations, animated GIFs are currently thriving on social media, while web platforms dedicated to facilitating their creation and providing electronic viewing galleries are also abundant (2). To…

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Light Moves Festival of Screendance 2015 announces Open Call for Papers and Presentations

Light Moves Festival of Screendance 2015 announces Open Call for Papers and Presentations for Symposium “Peeling Away the Layers”
Closing date: Friday 07 August
Festival dates: 19-22 November, Limerick

Light Moves festival of screendance has announced its open call for presentations and paper proposals for inclusion at the Light Moves Screendance Symposium 2015:  ‘Peeling away the layers’.  The symposium sits within the Light Moves festival and aims to encourage artistic and scholarly exchange, debate and discussion in screendance and related disciplines including performance, dance, film, visual arts, sound and text.  Hosted by Dance Limerick and DMARC (Digital Media and Arts Research Centre), University of Limerick, the Light Moves festival and symposium take place in Limerick from 19-22 November 2015.  Proposals should be submitted in PDF format only to lightmovesfestival@gmail.com by Friday 7th August 2015.  Full details are available from www.lightmoves.ie
Topics
Proposals for presentations, papers and project discussions are invited from national and international practitioners and scholars.  Experimental and/or group formats of presentation are welcome.  Papers and project presentations may include but are not limited to the following areas:
– Screendance as a language for social, cultural and political conversations.
– Let’s talk about digital: Challenging the allure of High Definition; The ubiquitous camera; Primitive technologies, embracing artefact and rediscovering lo-fi.
– Screendance conventions and the interplay between mainstream and experimental practices.
– Mediating and experiencing time in screendance (uninterrupted, compressed and expanded time).
– Harnessing performativity; liveness in screendance.
– Confronting stereotype (body, dance and location).
Submissions:
Proposals should be no more than 300 words and should include:
– Title of paper or presentation
– A maximum 300 word abstract (including brief description of the questions, concepts and topics to be explored)
– Preferred presentation format/approach
– A short biography
– A/V requirements
– Website links supporting the proposal, if available.

Light Moves festival of screendance 2015 takes place in Limerick from 19-22 November and follows the highly successful inaugural event last year.  Ireland’s only festival of screendance, Light Moves is dedicated to the art of dance film and video art with movement as a central theme. The festival is a response to the vibrant and expanding field of dance film / screendance in Ireland.  Light Moves is curated by Jurgen Simpson and Mary Wycherley and combines classics, family screenings, invited works, open submissions, and explorations of screendance with some of the most respected figures in the field.  Light Moves is supported by the Arts Council, Limerick City and County Council, Dance Limerick and DMARC, University of Limerick.  See www.lightmoves.ie

Light Moves 2015 Screendance Symposium Open Call

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screencast for getting started with screendance’s online submissions process

In this brief screencast International Journal of Screendance co-editor Simon Ellis outlines the basics of the Open Journal System: how to create a user account and how to upload a submission to the journal.

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