Category Archives: event

Light Moves 2017 – open call

The fourth international Light Moves Festival of Screendance symposium announces its open call for papers and presentations entitled Screendance Through the Senses. The symposium sits within the Light Moves festival and encourages artistic and scholarly exchange, debate and discussion in screendance and related disciplines including performance, dance, film, visual arts, sound and text.

Deadline: Mon 10 July 2017

More details: http://www.lightmoves.ie/open-call-screendance-symposium/

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Cinema as Ritual in Transfigured Time

Maya_Deren_Symposium

This was a somewhat spontaneous one-day symposium in Basel on the 20th May 2017, organised by Prof. Dr. Ute Holl, with and for students of the ‘Seminar Medienwissenschaften’ (Media Research Seminar) at the University of Basel, CH.

Convened in order to celebrate 100 years since the birth of Maya Deren, it aimed to explore the relation between dance and trance and cinema. Guest speakers included: Ling Ji Hon (who started the day of with a Tai Chi session), Christine Noll Brinckmann, Mathilde Rosier, Claudia Kappenberg, Moira Sullivan, Florence Freitag. The setting was suitably magical, hosted by Neues Kino Basel, a community-led romantic old building complete with Berlin-style ‘Hinterhof’, screening room, large kitchen diner and ample hang-out spaces.

Ute Hall invited everyone to fully immerse themselves in discussions, and to be flexible around timings and programming. This – and the delicious food – led to a lovely, relaxed and conversational atmosphere. Presenters had also been invited to mix academic discussions with more creative approaches and to screen personal work if suitable, which allowed for new connections to emerge between then and now and between different practices. My favourite was a presentation / screening by Mathilde Rosier, whose work has both visual rigour and a magical, playful character.

And guess what, Maya Deren’s footage and sound recordings from Haiti will feature in this year’s DOCUMENTA in Kassel, together with photos by Deren biographer Martina Kudlacek, work by the Haitian artist Andre Pierre and paintings by Amrita Sher-Gil. The exhibition is curated by Natasha Ginwala. See you there?!

Deren’s work clearly continues to fascinate and entrance people, and is perhaps more relevant than ever.

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Report from Panorama British Screendance

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I am following up on my last post about this event/ panorama in Bordeaux 11th May 2017: to make this happen, Camille Auburtin worked with three partners, the Cinéma Jean Eustache de Pessac in Bordeaux, who hosted the screening and lecture, the Université Populaire du Cinéma of Bordeaux (UNIPOP), and the independent association Cinéréseaux. It was an interesting forum as it brought together several different audiences of all ages, from young and mature filmmakers who work with dancers and screendance to those who had never heard of screendance/ video dance, but have a general interest in cinema and experimental work.

The films looked great on a massive screen in this 400 seater cinema, and were discussed in the context of experimental cinema’s rich history.

For a blog post on the event see: https://www.facebook.com/milleAub/posts/10155222269177246?match=Y2FtaWxsYXU%3D

 

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Panorama British Screendance

On the 11th May I will be presenting two film programmes in Bordeaux as part of an International Panorama of Screendance organised by L’UNIPOP, Université Populaire Cinéma in association with the Cinéma Jean Eustache Pressac.

Screendance is still relatively unknown in France, both as art practice and as a term (despite the Festival in Bourgogne that is run by Marisa Hayes and Franck Boulègue). French artists tend to speak of Videodance, Vidéodanse, which is not a very useful term and can send out the wrong signals. But apart from that, to an audience who does not know what this practice consist of, what kind of historical, British narrative would you propose and what works would you select for a screening?

I decided to start with the wonderful and groundbreaking structuralist filmmaking and artist’ moving image we have in Britain, to make a link with how movement was explored in these works and how it has developed more recently within screendance. Of course one could build many different programmes with this premise and thereby highlight different approaches and areas of choreographic and editorial interest. Below are the two programmes I will be screening in Bordeaux.

Programme 1 (Historical Perspective): Berlin Horse (1970) Malcolm Le Grice and The Whirlpool (1997) Jayne Parker, followed by Tattoo (2001) Miranda Pennell; Boy (1996) Rosemary Lee and Peter Anderson; Snow (2003) David Hinton and Rosemary Lee; Stand in (2009) Becky Edmunds; El Fuego (2007) Becky Edmunds; Snoplog (2014) Chien-Ming Chang and Katy Pendlebury; Edits (2013) Marisa Zanotti and Lea Anderson.

Programme 2 (Choreocinematic Sensibilities):  You made me Love you (2005) 4 minutes, video, Miranda Pennell; Human Radio (2002) 9 minutes, Super 16mm to video, Miranda Pennell; All This Can Happen (2012) 50 min, video, Siobhan Davies and David Hinton.

I look forward to seeing this body of work and to the ‘conversations’ that will emerge between the films.

Claudia Kappenberg

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Visual Cultures: Decoding the Music Video

This event explores how filmmakers of colour are responding to new technologies, creating fresh work that is opening up new spaces for conversation around the exclusivity of filmmaking.

https://www.ica.art/whats-on/visual-cultures-decoding-music-video

Friday 30 March 2017
Institute of Contemporary Arts, London
6:30pm

Call for Papers – Vidéo Danse de Bourgogne (France)

International Screendance Conference 2017 : Low-tech/Old-tech

Cameras do not make films; filmmakers make films. – Maya Deren

The fifth annual Screendance Conference held during the Festival International de Vidéo Danse de Bourgogne (France) is currently seeking papers that address the theme: low-tech/old-tech.  The conference will take place on June 1-2, 2017 at the University of Burgundy in Le Creusot, France.

As a festival that has consistently favored ideas and artistic ingenuity over imposing the use of so-called “high production values”, this year’s conference theme proposes an investigation into the aesthetics, politics, and practices surrounding the rejection of: environmental waste created by technological consumerism, equipment monopolies that limit creative freedoms, as well as the normalization of HD and other production values that potentially limit creation, curation, and distribution opportunities in screendance. Papers that consider how screendance has and can encourage an exchange of ideas and new forms of expression by eschewing capitalist economies of filmmaking in favor of radical re-imaginings of low-tech and old-tech equipment will be presented in the form of moderated panels, round tables and individual talks. Proposals for individual papers and/or entire panels will be considered.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • How economies of screendance include and exclude filmmakers during production, curation and/or distribution.
  • Re-evaluating the notion of production “values” – What is of value in production? And who decides?
  • Reuse and recycle – radical aesthetics and re-imagining of old and low-budget technologies. From the dirty camera lenses of Guy   Madden intentionally left opaque, to guerilla street filming tactics, how are old and low technologies engaged within the hybrid framework of screendance and to what ends?
  • Screendance pedagogy – using low-tech and/or old-tech devices to teach screendance and engage with communities, professionals, and/or students.
  • Analyses of individual films past and present that resonate with the conference theme are also encouraged.

In addition to film and performance studies, presentations that draw on complementary fields such as curatorial studies, art history, and other areas of creative and intellectual inquiry are welcome.

To propose a paper, please send a 500 word abstract that clearly states your topic, thesis, and supporting ideas. Keep in mind that paper presentations are normally twenty minutes in length. It is better to focus on one or several central ideas than to be overly ambitious in scope, which leaves little time for in depth consideration of the proposed topic. Please include a biography or C.V. with your proposal. Artist presentations (practice-based research) proposals are eligible, but must have a clear research focus that relates to the theme. Alternative presentation formats are welcome, but please describe your proposed format and technical needs clearly. The working language of the conference is English. Deadline for proposals: March 21, 2017. E-mail proposals to: info@videodansebourgogne.com  All proposals receive a confirmation e-mail upon receipt. Further notification will be sent to all proposals before April 1 via e-mail regarding status of acceptance. The call is also available at: https://videodansebourgogne.com/2013-screendance-conferencecolloque-cine-danse-2013/

About the conference: For five years the Festival International de Vidéo Danse de Bourgogne has proposed an annual two-day conference intended as an international meeting place for artists, scholars, students, and anyone interested in the intersections of choreography and the moving image. Occurring during the festival week, evening screenings, informal talks and other meet-ups compliment the conference presentations. Le Creusot is a small city situated on the train line between Paris and Lyon (one hour from Paris on the speed train, 20 minutes from Lyon). There is no fee to participate in the conference. Conference presentations may be invited for publication on the Screendance Studies blog or future publications, such as our 2015 book, Art in Motion: Current Research in Screendance:

http://www.cambridgescholars.com/art-in-motion

CHOREOCINEMA, Jan 2017 at the Barbican

Choreocinema: Counterpoints (15*) + ScreenTalk with Siobhan Davies & Miranda Pennell

Hosted by Claudia Kappenberg

24 January 2017 / 18:30
Cinema 3

Siobhan Davies and Miranda Pennell are both artists trained in dance who apply choreography to film. This evening they will present a selection of films and converse about the exploration of movement and stasis in their work.

The programme includes:

You Made Me Love You (
UK 2005) Dir Miranda Pennell 4 min

Why Colonel Bunny Was Killed (
UK 2010) Dir Miranda Pennell 28 min

The Running Tongue (UK 2015) Dir Siobhan Davies and David Hinton 30 min

Extract from All This Can Happen (UK 2012) Dir Siobhan Davies and David Hinton 50 min

This event is part of:

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All This Can Happen @ The White Cube London 6/10/2016

hat-sceneFilm on Sunday: Artist’s Choice

All This Can Happen: Chosen by Antony Gormley

White Cube Auditorium, Bermondsey
144 – 152 Bermondsey Street
London
SE1 3TQ

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OPEN CALL: Maya Deren 100 Wuppertal, Germany, June 16-18 2017

allsoulsinvited“Unstable Equilibrium / Instabiles Gleichgewicht” Maya Deren 100

Symposium/Screenings/Interventions  June 16-18 2017

Location: Neuer Kunstverein Wuppertal e.V., Wuppertal, Germany

Call for papers: submission deadline: 5 December 2016

For enquiries please email the curators of the symposium Claudia Kappenberg (C.Kappenberg@brighton.ac.uk) and Florence Freitag (florence.freitag@gmail.com)

2017 marks the year of Maya Deren’s 100th anniversary. Born in 1917, the Avant-Garde filmmaker, dancer, poet, writer, anthropologist and catalyst for what is called Choreo-Cinéma, has influenced artists and thinkers from different fields, in particular those interested in experimental film and in the intersection of film and dance. In 2017 her work is still relevant in terms of the images it offers, the stories it tells and the questions it asks about individual experience, communal traditions and our narratives. The interdisciplinarity of her work marks her as a pioneer of hybrid visual languages and has much to offer to contemporary artists whose work increasingly negotiates between different practices, languages and traditions. Whilst being highly refined and specific Deren’s work claims a “touche-à-tout”. This event will reflect on Deren’s work from several perspectives, to re-examine not only her films, but also her writing and her anthropological research into Haitian rituals and voudoun. Maya Deren 100 will run over three days and in three parts, with a symposium, a series of screenings, and interventions by contemporary artists.

Maya Deren – REpositioned aims to historically review and contextualise her work, her principles, aesthetics and methods from diverse contemporary perspectives. Engaging with Deren’s artistic, theoretical and pedagogical discourse, the symposium aims to foster discussions on choreographic, visual and performative languages, on the role and potentiality of narratives, on collaborations and on the idea of metamorphosis or change as suggested by Deren’s notion of Unstable Equilibrium. Furthermore, proposals are invited that examine Deren’s writings on ritual, her concern with time, space and matter, as well as those engaging with dialogues between (digital) screen bodies and live bodies, screen space and narrative time. Finally, Deren’s output as both female artist/auteur and as the main performer in her work is to be re-examined from today’s point of view.

Papers and project presentations may include, but are not limited to, the following areas:

→ Film & digital bodies vs live bodies

→ Choreo-Cinéma as/vs live performance

→ Film & poetry (e.g. vertical and other narratives)

→ Film & ritual, ritual and play

→ Anthropology as practice

→ Relation to time, space and place

→ Film and dance and relevant hybrid language

→ Documentation as practice (including the subject/object in front and behind the camera)

→ Instability, hybridity and continuity in the arts

Proposals should be no more than 300 words and must include:

  • Presentation title
  • 300 word abstract, to include a brief description of the questions, concepts and topics to be explored
  • Preferred presentation format/approach
  • AV requirements
  • Short biography

Maya Deren 100/Unstable Equilibrium is a project produced by Tanzrauschen e.V. (Sigurd-Christian Evers and Kerstin Hamburg) and Neuer Kunstverein Wuppertal e.V., organized in collaboration with initiator/artistic director Florence Freitag, as well as curators Claudia Kappenberg (University of Brighton, UK, International Journal of Screendance) and Dr. Elinor Cleghorn.

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Email and ipads in ancient Rome?

I spent a day with IT4Arts, the London City-based Worshipful Company of Information Technologists (a Guild) which provides free advice and training for non-for-profit Arts organisations such as the Screendance Journal, but also big established institutions such as, the Roundhouse, the Royal Albert Hall, Tate, and BBC etc.

A most fascinating talk was given by Tom Standage from The Economist, author of Writing on the Wall (2013). Applying current, social media vocabulary to the means of communication amongst the Romans and in the Middle Ages, he argued basically that they had networks of communication that functioned much like our social media, with messages and news that were sent from person to person, and with news that were trending across networks and others that faded away quickly.

According to Standage there are three phases of media development, with Really Old Media from 60BC through to 1833, Old Media until 2000, and New Media since then. The Really Old Media included paintings as a form of selfies, letters on papyrus delivered by slaves and copied to others as a sort of email equivalent, a whole system of messengers (tabelari) as broadband, and a culture of copying books and adding books to personal libraries as an equivalent to person to person distribution. An example of a social media savvy person as suggested by Standage is the Evangelist Paul, who wrote letters to key churches, such as his letter to the Colossians, knowing that they would be copied time and again until eventually every church would hold a copy and hear about his ideas. Strategic blogging and tweeting, in other words, is not exactly a new idea.

No doubt there were significant changes with the invention of the Gutenberg’s printing press with movable types in around 1450, but the changes were gradual. Initially any printing was small scale and served mainly to amplify the person to person distribution. For example, when Luther nailed his 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany, in protest against the Pope’s selling off of indulgences – which supposedly saved people from going to purgatory and which Luther saw as a complete con – he discovered the power of printed distribution. His first theses were written in Latin, addressing the more learned people and thereby limiting the readership. Noting the considerable interest in his theses Luther then translated them into a form of German, and it took a mere two weeks for the theses to be distributed around the whole of Germany. (A little side effect was that this nationwide distribution established a common German language.) According to Standage, Luther’s thesis can count as an excellent example of peer-to-peer distribution.

As Standage proposed, later historical social media phenomena were, for example, the coffee houses of the 1600s, which acted as debating chambers and thrived on the buzz created by the newly imported coffee. The Tudors had a thing called the commonplace books, which were personal diaries of sorts and used for noting poems and ideas. The commonplace books were shown to friends for the purpose of sharing inspiration and for copying. Occasionally, Standage added, they were circulated amongst several authors as in the court of Anne Boleyn and served to speculate and to ‘gossip’ on who was whose lover etc.

Only in 1833, Standard argued, did the press achieve the kind of mass distribution we know today, which established a radically different, controlling, and top-down circulation of the news. While in Luther’s time small printers would print, for example, a 1000 copies and remunerate the author by handing him 100 of those, from the 1800s the press was owned by the very wealthy who impose their own version of the news, temporarily overriding social media circuits.

Standage concluded that the social networks of the Really Old Media had essentially allowed for the same kind of synchronisation of opinions we experience today with twitter, blogging and Facebook, and which underpin events like the Arab Spring. Hence, the ‘new social media’ must be considered as a revival of ancient horizontal distribution systems. Current social media have amplified the reach and speed of communication  through new technologies, but they are not a new phenomenon as such. The old coffee houses – hotbeds of ideas and centres of innovation – meanwhile morphed, over time, into new kinds of businesses like insurance brokers, and fuelled collaborations and scientific discoveries.

All of this reminds me that getting together, talking and sharing ideas is absolutely vital for any culture. That was precisely the situation at the beginning of the screendance venture, when Doug Rosenberg, Katrina McPherson and I secured the funding from the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) for an international Network in Screendance. The Network fund allowed us to gather a set of key people and to meet twice a year, either in the US or the UK, and to spend a few days together talking. Most crucially the Network fund had not required us to predetermine what exactly we were going to do together! Out of these intensive encounters then came the idea, that we needed a dedicated platform for the publication of debates in the field of Screendance, and that led, a mere six months later, to the launch of the Screendance Journal. It is a great shame that nowadays days most funding proposals require a fully formed plan of action and a whole set of outcomes before one has even started meeting. This disregards how ideas are formed, and how people become productive. Three cheers for the AHRC for keeping up the Network Grant.

For videos of the IT4Arts talks see Information Technologists

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