Author Archives: hbench

The International Journal of Screendance Volume 8: Solo/Screen now online

IJSD_v8_2017_CoverSoloScreen

IJSD 8 (2017) Solo/Screen. Cover image and design by Carol Breen.

Volume 8 (2017) of The International Journal of Screendance is now available online. Contributors to volume 8 are: Hetty Blades, Kyle Bukhari, Carol Breen, Rosemary Candelario, Marie-Louise Crawley, Cara Hagan, Anna Heighway, Rosemary Lee, Anna Macdonald, Ariadne Mikou, Tracie Mitchell, Eiko Otake, Katja Vaghi, and John White. Volume 8 was edited by Harmony Bench and Simon Ellis with editorial assistance from Carol Breen. Tamara Tomić-Vajagić is Reviews Editor.

Journal website: http://screendancejournal.org/

Volume 8 direct link: http://dx.doi.org/10.18061/ijsd.v8i0

Be watching for a call for papers for volume 9, guest edited by Melissa Blanco Borelli (Royal Holloway University of London) and Raquel Monroe (Columbia College Chicago) on the theme Screening the Skin: Issues of Race and Nation in Screendance.

Advertisements

The International Journal of Screendance Volume 7: All This: Writings on “All This Can Happen” now online

ijsdv7cover

New International Journal of Screendance issue online: Special issue on “All This Can Happen” by Siobhan Davies and David Hinton, edited by Claudia Kappenberg with Sarah Whatley.

 

Light Moves festival of screendance 2016 Open Call for Film Submissions

Light Moves festival of screendance has announced its Open Call for Film Submissions for this year’s festival, which takes place in Limerick from 3-6 November 2016.  Filmmakers, choreographers and video artists are invited to submit for consideration screendance works which embrace dance and all forms of movement through the art of film and video art.  Submissions should be made via the festival website www.lightmoves.ie  The closing date for receipt of entries is Friday 27 May 2016.  Prizes will be awarded to both established and student practitioners for works submitted via the Open Call.  Full details, terms and conditions are available from www.lightmoves.ie.

Works which will be considered include:
– Long films exceeding 20 minutes duration to be presented in a cinematic context.
– Short films not exceeding 20 minutes duration to be presented in a cinematic context.
– Short films and video art to be presented on individual displays in a gallery/installation context.
– Documentaries.
– Student films in which the director and/or the choreographer is a registered student on a course up to and including MA level.

In addition to films which embrace dance, submissions that reflect the unique potential of cinematography and sound as well as alternative forms such as animation and computer modelling will also be considered.  While previously screened works are accepted, recent works will be given particular consideration in the selection process.

Announcing the Open Call Jenny Traynor, Director of Dance Limerick which produces Light Moves, said “We’re very excited to announce this year’s Open Call for film submissions for Light Moves.  The standard of work submitted by Irish and international practitioners since the festival began two years ago has been extremely high, so we’re very much looking forward to viewing this year’s entries.  Filmmakers should note our earlier than usual deadline and make sure to have their entries with us by the 27th of May”.

Light Moves is Ireland’s only festival dedicated to the art of dance on film and video art with movement as a central theme, and is a response to the vibrant and expanding field of dance film / screendance in Ireland and internationally.  The festival combines classics, family screenings, invited works, open submissions and explorations of screendance with some of the most respected figures in the field.  Light Moves is curated by Jurgen Simpson and Mary Wycherley and produced by Dance Limerick.  Light Moves is supported by the Arts Council, Limerick City and County Council, Dance Limerick and DMARC, University of Limerick.  See www.lightmoves.ie

Light Moves Festival of Screendance 2015 announces Open Call for Papers and Presentations

Light Moves Festival of Screendance 2015 announces Open Call for Papers and Presentations for Symposium “Peeling Away the Layers”
Closing date: Friday 07 August
Festival dates: 19-22 November, Limerick

Light Moves festival of screendance has announced its open call for presentations and paper proposals for inclusion at the Light Moves Screendance Symposium 2015:  ‘Peeling away the layers’.  The symposium sits within the Light Moves festival and aims to encourage artistic and scholarly exchange, debate and discussion in screendance and related disciplines including performance, dance, film, visual arts, sound and text.  Hosted by Dance Limerick and DMARC (Digital Media and Arts Research Centre), University of Limerick, the Light Moves festival and symposium take place in Limerick from 19-22 November 2015.  Proposals should be submitted in PDF format only to lightmovesfestival@gmail.com by Friday 7th August 2015.  Full details are available from www.lightmoves.ie
Topics
Proposals for presentations, papers and project discussions are invited from national and international practitioners and scholars.  Experimental and/or group formats of presentation are welcome.  Papers and project presentations may include but are not limited to the following areas:
– Screendance as a language for social, cultural and political conversations.
– Let’s talk about digital: Challenging the allure of High Definition; The ubiquitous camera; Primitive technologies, embracing artefact and rediscovering lo-fi.
– Screendance conventions and the interplay between mainstream and experimental practices.
– Mediating and experiencing time in screendance (uninterrupted, compressed and expanded time).
– Harnessing performativity; liveness in screendance.
– Confronting stereotype (body, dance and location).
Submissions:
Proposals should be no more than 300 words and should include:
– Title of paper or presentation
– A maximum 300 word abstract (including brief description of the questions, concepts and topics to be explored)
– Preferred presentation format/approach
– A short biography
– A/V requirements
– Website links supporting the proposal, if available.

Light Moves festival of screendance 2015 takes place in Limerick from 19-22 November and follows the highly successful inaugural event last year.  Ireland’s only festival of screendance, Light Moves is dedicated to the art of dance film and video art with movement as a central theme. The festival is a response to the vibrant and expanding field of dance film / screendance in Ireland.  Light Moves is curated by Jurgen Simpson and Mary Wycherley and combines classics, family screenings, invited works, open submissions, and explorations of screendance with some of the most respected figures in the field.  Light Moves is supported by the Arts Council, Limerick City and County Council, Dance Limerick and DMARC, University of Limerick.  See www.lightmoves.ie

Light Moves 2015 Screendance Symposium Open Call

Tagged , , , , , ,

Super Human

Last weekend I saw The Avengers (Avengers Assemble in the UK, dir. Joss Whedon). The film, based on Marvel Comics superheroes, features typical Hollywood special effects and an equally typical plot about saving the world—and more specifically Manhattan—from the devastation of alien invasion. Truth be told, I have grown bored with Hollywood superheroes and the lingering anxieties of cultural difference that continue to hide beneath the mask of epic battles between good and evil. What purpose do aliens, superheroes, zombies, and the like collectively serve other than to offer socially approved outlets for xenophobia and megalomania?

As I sat in the theater enveloped in the orange-black hues of onscreen explosions, I allowed my mind to wander and I wondered not only about the superheroes of the comic book variety but also those that have been cropping up in dance. There seems to be a rhetoric around virtuosic dancing that aligns dance with the superhuman. To be sure, the comparison of dancers to gods or superhumans (in a Euro-American context) has been standard fare at least since Nijinsky, but the over-use of slow motion in film and television has surely added to the perception that dancers access something that lies beyond the reach of “normal” human beings. How can anyone dispute the divinity of 2011/Season 8 So You Think You Can Dance (U.S.) winner Melanie Moore when her leap into Neil Haskell’s arms is slowed to keep her aloft like an angel? Time slows for French b-boy Lil Crabe (a.k.a. Arthur Cadre), propping up his balances so as to give viewers adequate time to contemplate his hyper-flexible contortions in the 2012 video “Break Ton Neck” (dir. Aleks Yde). But the link between the dancer and the superhuman has reached new heights with Jon Chu’s Web series The Legion of Extraordinary Dancers, or The LXD, which has been playing on Hulu since the summer of 2010. (For those who can’t access Hulu, videos from the series can also be found on YouTube.)

The format of heroes and villains allows The LXD to showcase truly fabulous movers in dance battles, and the formation of coalitions for good and evil—the Legion on the “good” side, the Alliance of the Dark on the “bad”—offers opportunities for complex group choreography. But like the fistfights and explosions that make superhero movies exciting, dance is both the reason for The LXD’s existence and a recurring disruption. Like many Hollywood dance films in recent memory, good storytelling is sacrificed to good dancing. Eye candy though it may be, The LXD does at least attempt to think outside the limiting frameworks of dance companies, exotic tourist destinations, and “the street” as the only legitimate contexts for popular dance onscreen. Though I find the webisodes aesthetically over-done—overexposed and dizzyingly edited—I appreciate the standard of dance ability the show represents. I still question, however, the usefulness of the superhuman as a model for dance. What does dance stand to gain from investing in this image? Why is dance (still) in need of superheroes?

Harmony

Tagged , , , , , ,

The International Journal of Screendance, Issue 2 Now Available!!

Issue # 2, of The International Journal of Screendance now available

Scaffolding the Medium

Scaffolding the Medium brings together a number of historical texts within the context of screendance as part of an endeavor to build a variable scaffolding, one that begins to both create a common knowledge base and also to support a kind of cantilevered interdisciplinarity. This issue contains five curated discussions which each take as their initial premise a key text that speaks to concerns relevant to the discourse of contemporary screendance. Iterative texts by writers including, Martin Heidegger, Amelia Jones, Laura Mulvey, Rosalind Krauss and Pia Ednie-Brown inspire reflections by Ann Cooper Albright, Ann Dils, Kent de Spain, Lisa Naugle and John Crawford, Tom Lopez, Harmony Bench, Hannah Kosstrin, Jason Farman, Melissa Blanco Borelli, Douglas Rosenberg, Virginia Piper, Terry Sprague, Rodrigo Alonso, Claudia Rosiny, Kyra Norman, Miranda Pennell, Augusto Corrieri, Simon Ellis, Dianne Reid and Lucy Cash. Artist’s pages by Adam Roberts, reviews by Scott deLahunta and Claudia Rosiny and a section on Maya Deren by Elinor Cleghorn.  Finally, the issue features a report on the recent Screendance Symposium in Brighton by Claudia Kappenberg and Sarah Whatley.  This issue is edited by Douglas Rosenberg and Claudia Kappenberg.

The International Journal of Screendance is published by Parallel Press at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

For ordering information please see:

http://journals.library.wisc.edu/index.php/screendance

 

Online edition coming soon!!

Tagged ,