community, screendance and writing: seeking submissions

I wanted to explore things that related to my life; less about the studio, more about what’s outside the studio.

– Charles Atlas (2011, https://www.frieze.com/issue/article/life-stages)

This is a call for papers for volume 5 of the International Journal of Screendance. The theme for this volume will be community and screendance, and we are interested in papers that test the ways in which a broad range of ideas about community influence screendance practices, philosophy, debates and work, and, indeed, how screendance practices and critical thinking might help us to question or subvert the nature and value of community.

Topics could include (but are not limited to):

• Interior positions

What happens to screendance practices when makers work from the inside of communities such as companies, collectives, and other organisations? Rather than standing outside existing works, dance companies, and artistic processes and outcomes, what are the ramifications of adopting an interior position? For example, how might thinking and methods from documentary practices and art film practices such as those used by Charles Atlas and Chantal Akerman suggest new strategies and approaches towards screendance?

• Community dance

Community Dance was once a label that signified choreographic processes and products which valued the social more than the artistic. What screendance practices have helped to question or redefine community arts practices? For example, practitioners like Andy Wood (UK) and Doug Rosenberg (USA) create work with and for their communities (and often with their friends). How is screendance being made through ideas of community? What are the community practices of screendance and why might they be important? Might these relatively small-scale community-oriented screendance practices be considered radical as our understanding of the idea of the social is stretched by the global reach of social media?

• Beyond and because of the computer

Ubiquitous personal computers – particularly laptops – with free video editing software lie at the heart of post-production techniques in film-making and screendance. These techniques happen, for the most part, alone. What might this solitude reveal about community in screendance? If working in your bedroom through a single screen is also about accessing the work of other people in your screendance community, then how does this change and feed our practices? From online tutorials, to the sharing of practices, tests and films, as we work alone we are part of various social interfaces that inform, nurture, and change our thinking and practice.

• Crowd funding

Has the rise of crowd-funding generated new or alternative economies that might support radical practices, emerging practice and minority practices? What alternatives exist, and how might work with – or experiences of – crowd funding generate or facilitate critical thinking about how our practices are part of social economies of practice, support and presentation?

• Support and collaboration

What mechanisms and approaches through various types of communities allow us to practice and thrive as individual artists with distinct visions, and how do such communities allow us to support each other? What collaborative screendance practices are emerging as artists respond to complex and demanding socio-economic environments?

• Screenings and festivals

Screendance festivals are the most common platform for screendance artists to develop and participate in communities around the world. They are where we show and discuss work, meet other practitioners, and have our work placed alongside other works in programs that are curated to a greater or less extent. But what of other methods for showing work? For example, how might single screenings build, disrupt or broaden our understanding of community?  Further to this, what role do screenings of canonical screendance works – Maya Deren, Stan Brakhage – have to play in developing community-based dialogues about our discipline?

We invite contributions of scholarly research, interviews, reviews, provocations, viewpoints, visual essays, and work by emerging scholars on the theme of community. For the purposes of review, please indicate which of the above categories best characterize your contribution. Please note: scholarly papers are peer-reviewed in a double-blind process, and should be 3500-6000 words. All other contributions will be reviewed by the editorial board. The deadline for all contributions is 1 August 2014. The volume will be published online in March 2015 following the peer-review and editorial process.

Previous issues of the IJSD are available at http://journals.library.wisc.edu/index.php/screendance.

Volume 5 of IJSD will be published online using the Open Journal System at screendancejournal.org.

Very best wishes

Harmony Bench and Simon Ellis (editors, Int J. of Screendance)

bench.9@osu.edu

simon.ellis@roehampton.ac.uk

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One thought on “community, screendance and writing: seeking submissions

  1. […] International Journal of Screendance’s Open Journal System is now live and ready to receive submissions for the latest volume. The URL […]

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