The Work Room launches new online screendance film series

Showcasing Scotland’s dance artists making work for screen
  • 4 new films commissioned by The Space interviewing choreographers and directors about the processes behind making their pieces
  • All of the dance artists are members of Glasgow-based, artist-led dance organisation The Work Room
  • Katrina McPherson, an award-winning director, screen dance artist and author of ‘Making Video Dance’, is producing the artist interviews
  • All films will be available to watch online for free via a new YouTube channel

Glasgow-based dance organisation The Work Room has been commissioned by digital commissioning agency The Space to showcase work from artists experimenting with dance and film, in a new series called ‘In Motion’. The works were created specifically for screen, commenting on subjects as diverse as Brexit, the uncertainty and stress felt when continually being forced to move house, women reclaiming the streets at night, and civil disobedience.

These films highlight how Scotland’s choreographers and dance artists are combining film and dance to make powerful creative expressions about the world we live in.

The first film will be released on Tuesday 3 April and will be streamed live on The Work Room’s Facebook page @theworkroomglasgow as well as available to watch on YouTube.

A new film will be released every Tuesday until 24 April.

Faux Pas, by Stasis
Shot in Glasgow’s Barrowlands, this film reacts against the visual stereotypes of young women often portrayed in mainstream film by showing how the female form can reclaim the streets at night. These women are far from vulnerable as they work closely and collaboratively to make space for themselves and have a riotous time among the industrial backstreets.

Never Walk Alone, by Bridie Gane
A timely piece that explores the UK’s relationship with Europe, Bridie uses extremely slow movement infused with a retro theatricality to produce a wry commentary that will resonate with many.

Movement in Progress, by Lucas Chih-Peng Kao
Taiwanese dancer Kai ended up moving house twelve times in a mere two years whilst living in Glasgow. This part-documentary part-dance performance is a touching story about how it feels to continually be on the move and how we hold onto memories attached to where we live.

Cells of Illegal Education, by Farah Saleh
Between 1988 and 1992, schools and universities in Occupied Palestine were closed by Israeli military rule and those who refused to abide were labelled as ‘cells of illegal education’. In this film, Fareh Saleh reenacts, transforms and deforms gestures that were exercised by students at Birzeit University to take a closer look at the role of civil disobedience in instigating societal change and how their echoes are felt in contemporary times.

Filmmaker and director of In Motion, Katrina McPherson says, For nearly 30 years, based in Scotland and often working internationally, I have made work in collaboration with many different dance artists, and taught the subject all over the world. It makes me particularly happy to see the wealth of activity in this area now happening in Scotland. Dance artists and filmmakers are using whatever technology they have to make movement-based work for screen that explores and communicates ideas, themes and stories they feel passionate about. I am very excited to have the opportunity to share some of this work with you through In Motion, a curated selection of original screen dance works, made in Scotland, and available to watch worldwide online.”

Director of The Work Room, Anita Clark says“We are very excited to be working with The Space to bring screendance from some of Scotland’s independent choreographers to new audiences. The Work Room empowers artists to lead in their practice, and In Motion is enabling us to develop this digitally.”

Fiona Morris, CEO and Creative Director of The Space said, “The Space is delighted to be partnering with The Work Room and supporting the organisation in both building its digital capacity, and ensuring its works are accessible to the widest possible audience.”

https://theworkroom.org.uk/

Watch the films online at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC73044vqz2LDQ2Rbg9AS_2A

Notes for editors

About The Work Room
The Work Room (TWR) is an artist-led organisation, committed to supporting a sustainable environment for independent artists working in dance in Scotland. Our mission is to empower artists to lead in their practice, enabling them to make high quality, pioneering dance for diverse contexts at home and internationally. We are based within Glasgow’s Tramway where we have a studio for choreographic residencies.

The Work Room is supported by Creative Scotland as an RFO and by Glasgow City Council.

About The Space

The Space is a commissioning and development organisation, established by Arts Council England and the BBC to support greater digital access to the arts. The Space is committed to supporting and facilitating the UK arts sector to realise its digital ambitions. The organisation commissions arts projects and provides a production and distribution support to ensure that these projects reach a wide and diverse range of audiences. The Space has supported In Motion through funding from Creative Scotland, Arts Council England, and the BBC.

Biography
Katrina McPherson is award-winning screen dance artist, whose single, multi-screen and online works have been presented at venues and festivals world-wide. She trained as a dancer and choreographer at Laban, London after which an early career fascination with the creative possibilities of dance and the moving image took her to art college to study video art. A number of works directed by Katrina are held in collections including Lux Artists’ Moving Image UK, Routledge Performance Archive and the British Council. She is a director of arts programmes for UK television making films for BBC, Scottish Television and Channel Four, and was co-director of Goat Media Productions from 2001-2015.  Katrina has taught screen dance in the UK, Australia, Germany, USA, Canada and China and she is the author of Making Video Dance (Routledge 2006), the first workbook for screen dance which is used as a core text for courses at universities world-wide, with a new edition due out in the summer 0f 2018.

Advertisements

LONDON CONTEMPORARY DANCE SCHOOL LAUNCHING NEW MA IN SCREENDANCE

London Contemporary Dance School is launching a new Master of Arts programme focusing on the artistic practice, curation and scholarship of Screendance. As the only MA in the world that currently specialises in Screendance, the programme offers a much needed arena for further exploration by practicing artists already making work for screen who are seeking to develop their practical, professional and creative skills.

The programme will be delivered by a leading practitioners in the art from including Gitta Wigro, Lucy Cash and course leader Gabriella Tropia. The MA is subject to validation by the University of Kent. The course will commence in September 2018 with applications opening end of January 2018.

London Contemporary Dance School is part of the creative powerhouse for new dance The Place, which is located in the heart of London’s Knowledge Quarter an area of one mile radius that is home to 75 academic, cultural, research, scientific and organisations including British Library, Central Saint Martins, UCL, Crafts Council, Sadler’s Wells and Google.

Clare Connor, Chief Executive of The Place said about the programme; ‘As the leading home for new dance we are pleased to offer this trailblazing MA course that will nurture innovation and entrepreneurship for artists who seek to lead and shape this flourishing art form.’

For more information about the course and how to apply. www.lcds.ac.uk/screendance

Tagged , , ,

Maya Deren Forum – Spiel und Ritual

For all those in or around Wuppertal, Germany

Donnerstag, 9. November 2017, 19:00 Uhr, Eintritt frei

2017 wäre Maya Deren 100 Jahre alt geworden. Die 1917 geborene Avantgarde-Filmemacherin, Tänzerin, Poetin, Autorin, Anthropologin und Ausgangspunkt dessen, was kurz darauf als Choreo-Cinéma benannt wurde, hat Künstler und Denker verschiedenster Hintergründe gleichermaßen beeinflusst; insbesondere im Experimentalfilm und in der Verbindung von Film und Tanz.

Vortrag und Film-Screening
Referenten: Florence Freitag and Dr. Claudia Kappenberg

Wo:

Neuer Kunstverein Wuppertal

Hofaue 51 (Kolkmannhaus)

42103 Wuppertal

www.tanzrauschen.de/maya-deren-100/

Die Veranstaltung ist eine Kooperation von Tanzrauschen e.V. Wuppertal und Neuer Kunstverein Wuppertal e.V.

Tagged , , , , ,

British dancefilm in Brussels festival

I spent a couple of days in Brussels, where I attended the 6th International Dancefilm Festival L’Art Difficile de Filmer La Danse, which runs 4-7 October at the Cinematek, Danscentrumjette and Argos. The artistic directors are Stefanie Bodien and Wolfgang Kolb, who run the festival together with Roxane Huilmand.

This festival always has one day where it focuses on a particular country, and this time it showed a selection of historical and contemporary British films. Roxane Huilmand and Wolfgang Kolb visited the UK earlier this year where they viewed films at the Lux and the BFI, and met with Gitta Wigro and others. The final selection and curation of the screenings was done by Wolfgang Kolb and Stefanie Bodien, who invited Simon Whitehead to perform at the opening night and asked me to give an overview of dance film in the UK and to introduce the films.

The list of films is included below. It was a great pleasure seeing this selection of films that began with Mime Dance, a 2min film by Ms Mary Montgomery from 1928,  and proceeded via Len Lye’s work for the British, General Post Office (GPO) from the 1930’s and a film by the Rambert Dance Company from the 1970s to work from artists of the London Filmmaker’s Coop, to the more familiar screendance by Peter Anderson, Miranda Pennell and Lloyd Newson, to visual artist Mark Lecky’s Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore (1999), and finished gloriously with Charles Atlas and Michael Clark’s collaboration Hail the New Puritain (1986). The films were organised into four programmes which we watched one after the other, from 3pm to about 10.30pm. It was a feast and most engaging selection and we left hungry for more!

There were some unusual or even controversial works, in particular Dirty (1971), Steven Dwoskin, in which the camera scrutinises two female bodies not unlike most of his other work. A deliberately rough soundtrack and grainy image interfered with the visual consumption of the images to some extend, but more than any other work this film raises questions as to the cinematic gaze and our visual pleasure. Within the 20 or so films and historical narrative, this work was useful though to challenge our spectating. Another intriguing work was Imprint (1974), by Clive Meyer & John Chesworth and the Rambert Dance Company. The 70’s really did take the viewer on a journey and examined the film frame in spectacular ways. I had not seen this film and I found it spellbinding. A film like Boy (1995) by Peter Anderson and Rosemary Lee, perhaps demonstrates the excellence of the area of British TV screendance, and a few other projects could have been included here. But time was limited and finishing the screening with the exhuberant and fantastic Atlas/ Clark collaboration was a brilliant choice in that it embedded dancefilm in a wider cultural context, in this case post-punk London, and played with numerous registers of human frailty and extravagant performance.

Once again I am reminded how important curation is and how much it can open films to new readings and contexts. This programme would be worth taking on tour, to other festivals and other continents. Any takers?

Claudia Kappenberg (Image above: What People Do, Andrew Bar McKay 1981)

List of screened films: 

Memories of Mirrors Ursula Mayer 4’ 9

Mime Dance by Miss Mary Montgomery 2’ 9

Rainbow Dance Len Lye 4’ 9

Between Two Worlds Guy L. Côté 19’ 9

Imprint Clive Meyer & John Chesworth 45’ 9

 

Mantra Jeanette Iljon 6’ 10

Dirty Steven Dwoskin 14’ 10

What People Do Andrew Barr McKay 22’ 10

Falling Under Nicola Baldwin 15’ 10

Pointillist Dance David Leister 14’ 10

 

Dance House n° 2 Tim Albery 6’ 11

Dance House n° 3 Peter Mumford 6’ 11

Boy Peter Anderson/ Rosemary Lee 5’ 11

Lounge Miranda Pennell 7’ 11

Fiorruci Made Me Hardcore Mark Leckey 15’ 11

The Cost Of Living Lloyd Newson 34’ 11

 

Hail the New Puritan Charles Atlas/ Michael Clark 85’ 12

 

Tagged , , ,

Light Moves 2017 – open call

The fourth international Light Moves Festival of Screendance symposium announces its open call for papers and presentations entitled Screendance Through the Senses. The symposium sits within the Light Moves festival and encourages artistic and scholarly exchange, debate and discussion in screendance and related disciplines including performance, dance, film, visual arts, sound and text.

Deadline: Mon 10 July 2017

More details: http://www.lightmoves.ie/open-call-screendance-symposium/

Tagged , , ,

volume 9 call for papers: screening the skin

Screening the Skin: Issues of Race and Nation in Screendance

Guest editors: Melissa Blanco Borelli (Royal Holloway University of London) and Raquel Monroe (Columbia College, Chicago)

This is a call for papers for volume 9 of the International Journal of Screendance. The theme for this volume will interrogate the assumption that the screen is a white space. In similar fashion to Richard Dyer’s work on whiteness, screens and filmic representation, we are interested in questioning the ‘space’ of the screen as one that constructs particular raced imaginaries, yet one that is predominantly imagined as ‘white.’ Just as the art world is questioning the idea of the “white cube” and the gallery space, we would like to find alternative modes and voices for engaging with the idea of a white screen. We would like to receive contributions that showcase a broad range of ideas on how race intersects with screendance, philosophies, aesthetics, mediation, and notions of subjectivity and the artist.

We envision contributions to be centered around the practice and mediation of dance via the screen. Contributors might choose to speak about video artists, practices, media circulation of viral videos, racialized/affective communities as they manifest on screens on the Internets, Holly/Bolly/Nollywood casting and representation practices, screendance festivals, and historiographies of screendance.

Other topics could include:

  • Discourses of decolonizing aesthetics
  • Issues of citizenship, migration, and national identity
  • Intersections of race with gender, sexuality, class, ability, and more
  • The gallery or other spaces of display and presentation
  • Circulation, consumption and commodification of identities and aesthetics

Schedule:

  • Submission Deadline: Friday 1 September 2017
  • Publication Date: April/May 2018 following the peer-review and editorial process

For enquiries regarding this volume please email the IJSD guest editors Melissa Blanco Borelli (melissa.blanco@rhul.ac.uk) and Raquel Monroe (rmonroe@colum.edu).

For general inquiries regarding IJSD please email the editors Harmony Bench (bench.9@osu.edu) and Simon Ellis (simonkellis@gmail.com).

Previous issues of the IJSD are available at www.screendancejournal.org.

Further information

  • Scholarly articles (3500–6000 words) are peer-reviewed in a fully anonymous process. All other contributions will be reviewed by the editorial board: http://screendancejournal.org/about/editorialTeam. We are also interested in publishing Interviews (2000–3000 words), Reviews of books, films, or events (750–1000 words) and Provocations and Viewpoints (750–1000 words). For the purposes of review, please indicate which of the above categories best characterizes your contribution.
  • If you are interested in submitting a contribution that does not fall into the above categories, please contact the editors for additional direction.
  • Authors must register with IJSD at http://screendancejournal.org in order to upload submissions. All submissions should be uploaded by authors in .docx or .rtf format.
  • Please use the IJSD style guide – http://screendancejournal.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines – to correctly format your document.
  • Example article (to help with formatting and style guide questions): http://dx.doi.org/10.18061/ijsd.v5i0.4423
  • Publications in all sections are indexed, but only scholarly articles are peer-reviewed. Please see IJSD’s Editorial Policies: http://screendancejournal.org/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies for more information.
  • The International Journal of Screendance is published via the Open Journal System: https://pkp.sfu.ca/ojs/.
  • IJSD is published in English and uses American spelling and punctuation.
  • IJSD is published as PDF and HTML files and is fully open access. We serve the screendance field as a whole; therefore, there are no fees for submission, processing, publication, or access to IJSD.
Tagged , ,

The International Journal of Screendance Volume 8: Solo/Screen now online

IJSD_v8_2017_CoverSoloScreen

IJSD 8 (2017) Solo/Screen. Cover image and design by Carol Breen.

Volume 8 (2017) of The International Journal of Screendance is now available online. Contributors to volume 8 are: Hetty Blades, Kyle Bukhari, Carol Breen, Rosemary Candelario, Marie-Louise Crawley, Cara Hagan, Anna Heighway, Rosemary Lee, Anna Macdonald, Ariadne Mikou, Tracie Mitchell, Eiko Otake, Katja Vaghi, and John White. Volume 8 was edited by Harmony Bench and Simon Ellis with editorial assistance from Carol Breen. Tamara Tomić-Vajagić is Reviews Editor.

Journal website: http://screendancejournal.org/

Volume 8 direct link: http://dx.doi.org/10.18061/ijsd.v8i0

Be watching for a call for papers for volume 9, guest edited by Melissa Blanco Borelli (Royal Holloway University of London) and Raquel Monroe (Columbia College Chicago) on the theme Screening the Skin: Issues of Race and Nation in Screendance.

Cinema as Ritual in Transfigured Time

Maya_Deren_Symposium

This was a somewhat spontaneous one-day symposium in Basel on the 20th May 2017, organised by Prof. Dr. Ute Holl, with and for students of the ‘Seminar Medienwissenschaften’ (Media Research Seminar) at the University of Basel, CH.

Convened in order to celebrate 100 years since the birth of Maya Deren, it aimed to explore the relation between dance and trance and cinema. Guest speakers included: Ling Ji Hon (who started the day of with a Tai Chi session), Christine Noll Brinckmann, Mathilde Rosier, Claudia Kappenberg, Moira Sullivan, Florence Freitag. The setting was suitably magical, hosted by Neues Kino Basel, a community-led romantic old building complete with Berlin-style ‘Hinterhof’, screening room, large kitchen diner and ample hang-out spaces.

Ute Hall invited everyone to fully immerse themselves in discussions, and to be flexible around timings and programming. This – and the delicious food – led to a lovely, relaxed and conversational atmosphere. Presenters had also been invited to mix academic discussions with more creative approaches and to screen personal work if suitable, which allowed for new connections to emerge between then and now and between different practices. My favourite was a presentation / screening by Mathilde Rosier, whose work has both visual rigour and a magical, playful character.

And guess what, Maya Deren’s footage and sound recordings from Haiti will feature in this year’s DOCUMENTA in Kassel, together with photos by Deren biographer Martina Kudlacek, work by the Haitian artist Andre Pierre and paintings by Amrita Sher-Gil. The exhibition is curated by Natasha Ginwala. See you there?!

Deren’s work clearly continues to fascinate and entrance people, and is perhaps more relevant than ever.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Tagged , ,

Report from Panorama British Screendance

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I am following up on my last post about this event/ panorama in Bordeaux 11th May 2017: to make this happen, Camille Auburtin worked with three partners, the Cinéma Jean Eustache de Pessac in Bordeaux, who hosted the screening and lecture, the Université Populaire du Cinéma of Bordeaux (UNIPOP), and the independent association Cinéréseaux. It was an interesting forum as it brought together several different audiences of all ages, from young and mature filmmakers who work with dancers and screendance to those who had never heard of screendance/ video dance, but have a general interest in cinema and experimental work.

The films looked great on a massive screen in this 400 seater cinema, and were discussed in the context of experimental cinema’s rich history.

For a blog post on the event see: https://www.facebook.com/milleAub/posts/10155222269177246?match=Y2FtaWxsYXU%3D

 

Tagged , ,

Panorama British Screendance

On the 11th May I will be presenting two film programmes in Bordeaux as part of an International Panorama of Screendance organised by L’UNIPOP, Université Populaire Cinéma in association with the Cinéma Jean Eustache Pressac.

Screendance is still relatively unknown in France, both as art practice and as a term (despite the Festival in Bourgogne that is run by Marisa Hayes and Franck Boulègue). French artists tend to speak of Videodance, Vidéodanse, which is not a very useful term and can send out the wrong signals. But apart from that, to an audience who does not know what this practice consist of, what kind of historical, British narrative would you propose and what works would you select for a screening?

I decided to start with the wonderful and groundbreaking structuralist filmmaking and artist’ moving image we have in Britain, to make a link with how movement was explored in these works and how it has developed more recently within screendance. Of course one could build many different programmes with this premise and thereby highlight different approaches and areas of choreographic and editorial interest. Below are the two programmes I will be screening in Bordeaux.

Programme 1 (Historical Perspective): Berlin Horse (1970) Malcolm Le Grice and The Whirlpool (1997) Jayne Parker, followed by Tattoo (2001) Miranda Pennell; Boy (1996) Rosemary Lee and Peter Anderson; Snow (2003) David Hinton and Rosemary Lee; Stand in (2009) Becky Edmunds; El Fuego (2007) Becky Edmunds; Snoplog (2014) Chien-Ming Chang and Katy Pendlebury; Edits (2013) Marisa Zanotti and Lea Anderson.

Programme 2 (Choreocinematic Sensibilities):  You made me Love you (2005) 4 minutes, video, Miranda Pennell; Human Radio (2002) 9 minutes, Super 16mm to video, Miranda Pennell; All This Can Happen (2012) 50 min, video, Siobhan Davies and David Hinton.

I look forward to seeing this body of work and to the ‘conversations’ that will emerge between the films.

Claudia Kappenberg

Tagged ,
Advertisements